Gene Test Might Spot Soccer Players at High Risk for Brain Trouble

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., explains his published research suggesting that a gene variant, APOE-e4, increases the risk for cognitive impairment among amateur soccer players who most frequently head the ball. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein, and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.

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Oral Contraception Linked to Smaller Hypothalamus

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his study, presented as an abstract at the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting, on the association between oral contraception use and the size of the brain’s hypothalamus. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein, and director of MRI Services at Montefiore. 

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Lawmaker Says Support Has Grown for Tackle Football Bill

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., says additional research is necessary to establish a causal link between youth football tackling and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein, and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.


Headers in Soccer Cause More Brain Damage in Women Than Men, New Study Says

Research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., finds that soccer heading caused five times more brain damage in women than in men and that female players had eight brain regions where injuries were detected compared to three regions in males. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology at Einstein and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.

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Calls for Football Authorities to Restrict Children Heading Ball Ramped Up After Latest Findings

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., explains that soccer heading—not unintentional head impacts from collisions—causes more cognitive impairment than unintentional collisions.  Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein, and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.

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Heading a Soccer Ball May Hurt Women's Brains More Than Men's

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., describes his research that found women sustain more severe brain injury than men from soccer ball heading. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.


Brain Trauma Scientists Turn Their Attention to Soccer

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his research on the effect of heading in soccer on the brain. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein, and director of MRI Services at Montefiore.


NPR interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., on his research that finds frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under-recognized cause of concussion symptoms. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and director of MRI Services at Montefiore Health System.

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SciTechNow interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about the use of advanced imaging techniques in concussion research. Dr. Lipton explains how diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures the diffusion of water in the brain, allowing researchers to assess a potential injury. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


WDDE (Delaware NPR) interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about the impact of heading in soccer on the brain. Dr. Lipton is collaborating with a researcher who is working with the University of Delaware women’s soccer team. The players wear a special device that measures the number, type and force of soccer balls to the head and Dr. Lipton images the players’ brains to determine what, if any, damage occurs over time. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Chicago Tribune interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., on research investigating the impact of “heading” in soccer on the brain. Dr. Lipton, whose findings are described in the article, suggests that it is still unclear what the real-world implications of heading on the brain function of players. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


Capital New York features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that examines the impact of repeated blast exposures on the brains of veterans. Dr. Lipton notes that more exposures result in increased abnormalities and worse symptoms. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


The New Yorker reports on the growing concern about concussions in soccer. Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his research on head injury in amateur players from heading. Dr. Lipton’s studies have found that repeated, deliberate sub-concussive hits from heading damages the brains of players and leads to cognitive and memory problems. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


CBSNews.com interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about the FDA consumer alert for dietary supplements that falsely claim to prevent or cure concussions. Dr. Lipton notes that such claims may lead people to be less careful than they should and that the best way to prevent a concussion is to not have a head injury. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.


New York Times' "Room for Debate,” on online op-ed section, included a contribution from Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., on a new campaign to limit heading by youth soccer players. The discussion was sparked by a campaign launched by former Women’s U.S. National Soccer Team players who recommend heading be banned until players reach high school. The New York Times coverage on the campaign cited Dr. Lipton’s research on the impact of heading on amateur soccer players. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.