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Einstein in the Media

The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

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Treating vascular dementia patients with the drug Cerebrolysin may not help patients to a meaningful extent, explains Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., in Reuters.  Dr. Verghese notes that although a new study found improvement in patients on the drug was statistically significant, it was so slight that patients and family members wouldn’t be likely to notice it. Cerebrolysin is not approved by the FDA, but is available outside the U.S. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, January 31, 2013)

 

U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay) interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., about new research indicating that certain antidepressants can be used to treat depression in Parkinson's patients without worsening their motor problems. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology at Einstein and chief of geriatrics at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, April 12, 2012)

 

The Chicago Tribune interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., for an article on how participation in an improvisational comedy group may improve the lives of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Verghese notes that these activities, like other mentally stimulating pastimes, might build "cognitive reserve," or resilience in the brain. People with large amounts of cognitive reserve might, for instance, begin showing symptoms of Alzheimer's at 75, instead of at 70. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology. (Wednesday, July 13, 2011)

 

AARP The Magazine interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., on his research that found frequent dancing was the only physical activity of the nine studied that appeared to lower the risk of dementia. He notes that dancing, unlike other physical activities, involves significant mental effort and social interaction, which have both shown to reduce the risk of dementia. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology at Einstein. (Friday, March 25, 2011)

 

United Press International highlights a recent study by Joe Verghese, M.D., which showed that computer brain games might help the weak elderly stay mobile. Frail seniors who participated in a brain fitness program three times a week for eight weeks improved their speed of walking. The findings could have important implications for preventing disability and improving quality of life. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology at Einstein. (Thursday, August 12, 2010)

 

Los Angeles Times interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., about a recent study that found that the hardening of the aging brain's blood vessels reduces their ability to respond to changes in blood pressure, increasing the risk of falls among the elderly. Dr. Verghese notes that treating high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes to reduce the stiffening would help reduce the incidence of falls. Dr. Verghese is associate professor in The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Louis and Gertrude Feil Faculty Scholar in Neurology. (Tuesday, May 18, 2010)

 

Reuters Health interviews Charles Hall, Ph.D., on his study that finds stimulating brain activities delay the onset of dementia. The research, led by Dr. Hall and Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., was published in the August 4 online edition of Neurology. Dr. Hall is professor of epidemiology & population health and of neurology. Dr. Verghese is associate professor of neurology and director of the division of cognitive & motor aging. (Tuesday, August 04, 2009) read more...

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Time interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., on the connection between social activity and the mental and physical health of the elderly. Dr. Verghese is associate professor of neurology. In 2002, he published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine showing that changes in walking patterns could be an early sign of dementia. (Tuesday, June 23, 2009) read more...

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