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Einstein in the Media

The New York Times and NPR feature Nir Barzilai, M.D., and one of his centenarian study participants in a joint article on aging. Dr. Barzilai notes that as a scientist, his goal isn’t to help people live longer, but to live healthier. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, November 19, 2014)

 

Wall Street Journal features new research by Nir Barzilai, M.D. that found lower levels of growth hormone are associated with extended lifespan in centenarians. Concerns about the dangers of using human growth hormone (HGH) as an anti-aging agent—a growing $4 billion industry—are increasing. Dr. Barzilai notes hormones that might have some beneficial effect for children with stunted growth may have a negative effect on aging adults. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research.

(Tuesday, March 25, 2014)

 

NPR interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study that showed men who adopted healthier lifestyles had longer telomeres. Telomeres protect the tips of chromosomes and are associated with lower risk for many chronic diseases and longer lifespan. Dr. Barzilai notes that the study doesn't answer the fundamental question of causation — whether someone is healthy because they have longer telomeres or someone's telomeres become longer because they are healthy. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research.

(Tuesday, September 17, 2013)

 

Geoffrey Kabat, Ph.D., interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., in a Forbes article about his aging research and the genetic determinants of healthy longevity. Dr. Kabat reports that Dr. Barzilai’s lab has discovered several genetic variants that appear to extend human health-span, one of which is the basis of a drug currently in phase III clinical trials. Dr. Kabat is a senior epidemiologist at Einstein. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein’s Institute for Aging Research.

(Thursday, May 30, 2013)

 

Several Einstein faculty members and their research are featured in a National Geographic cover story on the potential genetic roots of longevity.  Harry Ostrer, M.D., Roee Holtzer, Ph.D., and Nir Barzilai, M.D., are quoted, providing insight into the some likely genetic factors of healthy aging and the varied physiological and behavioral outcomes of these factors. Ongoing epigenetic investigations by Francine Einstein, M.D. and John Greally, M.B.B.Ch, Ph.D., are also highlighted, as is Dr. Holtzer’s collaborator Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S.

(Thursday, April 18, 2013)

 

Richard Dawkins interviews Nir Bazilai, M.D., on U.K. TV about the trade-off between living longer and having fewer children. (Segment begins at 28:15) Mr. Dawkins, an English evolutionary biologist and author, also interviews Irving Kahn, a participant in Dr. Barzilai's The Longevity Genes Project, in his new series titled "Sex, Death and the Meaning of Life." Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Wednesday, October 31, 2012)

 

Nature.com interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a surprising new study in primates that found severe calorie restriction did not lead to longer life. Dr. Barzilai notes that genetics is more important than diet and lifestyle for the centenarians who he has studied as part of The Longevity Genes Project.  Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Thursday, August 30, 2012)

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Slate.com

 

In a Reuters article, Nir Barzilai, M.D., describes the genetic edge centenarians have and the promise of whole genome sequencing to uncover it. Dr. Barzilai, who heads Einstein’s Longevity Genes Project, helped develop the Archon Genomics X-Prize, which will award $100 million to the first team to sequence the complete genomes of 100 centenarians within 30 days. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Monday, July 23, 2012)

 

CBS Sunday Morning explores recent advances in the science of aging, including insights uncovered by Nir Barzilai, M.D., through his Longevity Genes Project. Dr. Barzilai’s ongoing study of over 500 healthy centenarians has demonstrated that most of the participants have a genetic advantage over the rest of the population that allows them to avoid age-related diseases. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Dr. Barzilai’s section begins 3 minutes into the segment.)

(Monday, July 09, 2012)

 

Bloomberg BusinessWeek interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about whole genome sequencing of the elderly and how it may reveal the secrets to healthy aging. Dr. Barzilai notes that the centenarians in his Longevity Genes Project have just as many genetic variants for diseases as the rest of the population, but they also have rare genetic variants that protect them from developing those diseases. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Wednesday, June 20, 2012)

 

CBS Evening News features Nir Barzilai, M.D., his aging research and Irving Kahn, a centenarian enrolled in Einstein's Longevity Research Project. Dr. Barzilai, who found that his healthy centenarian study participants were twice as likely to have the cholesterol-controlling CETP gene, notes that the development of drugs mimicking the genes of so-called "SuperAgers" could help protect against age-related diseases in the general population. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Thursday, May 31, 2012)

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The Huffington Post
U.S. News & World Report
MSNBC
WebMD
ABCNews.com
UPI

 

U.S. News & World Report interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his longevity genes research with healthy centenarians, or so-called SuperAgers. Dr. Barzilai notes that many of his vital study participants smoke, drink and are overweight, but with the right genes, their bodies are protected. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Friday, May 11, 2012)

 

The Daily News interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about the rise in senior citizens staying in the workforce into their 80s and 90s and his research into the longevity genes of SuperAgers, a group of healthy and active centenarians. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Monday, April 30, 2012)

 

The Associated Press interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about falsified University of Connecticut research on resveratrol, the red wine ingredient thought to improve health. Dr. Barzilai notes that the allegations will have no impact on resveratrol research because encouraging results have emerged from numerous labs around the world, including Einstein’s. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Friday, January 13, 2012)

 

CBS’ The Early Show interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his genetics research into exceptional longevity in a segment featuring Longevity Genes Project study participant and world’s oldest stock broker Irving Kahn (age 105). Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Wednesday, December 14, 2011)

 

The Forward has named Nir Barzilai, M.D., to “The Forward 50,” the magazine’s annual list of those who have made a significant impact on the Jewish story in the past year. Dr. Barzilai, who was recently featured in a cover story in New York magazine, was highlighted in The Forward for his longevity research at Einstein and leadership role in the centenarian consortium for the $10 million Archon Genomics X Prize competition. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Thursday, November 17, 2011)

 

New York magazine interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Gil Atzmon, Ph.D., for a cover story on exceptional aging that centers on Irving Kahn (age 105) and his siblings, all participants in Einstein’s Longevity Genes Project. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. Dr. Atzmon is assistant professor of medicine and of genetics. (Monday, November 07, 2011)

 

USA Today (via HealthDay) interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study that showed removing "senescent" cells – aging cells that do not function properly and disrupt surrounding healthy tissues – reduced or even eliminated age-related diseases in mice. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Thursday, November 03, 2011)

 

Associated Press interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his longevity research and the Archon Genomics X PRIZE, a $10 million dollar competition that challenges teams to sequence the complete genomes of healthy centenarians, some of which will come from Dr. Barzilai’s Longevity Genes Project. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Wednesday, October 26, 2011)

 

The Washington Post's "The Checkup" blog features new research by Nir Barzilai, M.D., that finds centenarians are no more virtuous than the general population in terms of their diet, exercise routine or smoking and drinking habits (includes video). Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Wednesday, August 03, 2011)

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Bloomberg
MSN (via Healthday) (quoting Jill Crandall, M.D.)
The Telegraph (UK)
Daily Mail (UK)
Jerusalem Post
Agence France-Presse
Belfast Telegraph
The Toronto Sun
CBS Radio News (segment begins two-thirds into audio file)
The Huffington Post
NBC's The Today Show (via LiveScience)
WebMD
The Los Angeles Times
CBC News
The New York Times "Well" blog
The Boston Globe
CNNHealth.com
Time.com
The Washington Times
Science Friday
The New York Times

 

WSJ.com interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his ongoing research with more than 500 centenarians, some whose unhealthy habits – including smoking and overeating – seem to have no impact on their longevity. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of both the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. For more on Dr. Barzilai's research, visit www.SuperAgers.com. (Wednesday, July 13, 2011)

 

The Wall Street Journal interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., for an article on financial planning for individuals expected to live into their 90s. While the article details some investment and insurance options designed to cover the increased costs of living longer, Dr. Barzilai notes that the final healthcare costs for centenarians are typically about one-third of those costs for someone who dies at 67. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Monday, June 20, 2011)

 

Seattle NPR station KUOW interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., about the biology of aging and the genetics of longevity. Dr. Cuervo discussed autophagy, the process of cell regulation, and the role it plays in keeping organs young, potentially leading to longer life spans. Dr. Barzilai discussed his genetic research with centenarians and the importance of discovering the key to healthy aging. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Friday, April 08, 2011)

 

Reuters Health interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study showing that men who reach the age of 85 tended to have high levels of good cholesterol (HDL) – over 50 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) – while in their 60s. Dr. Barzilai notes that while exercise may raise a person’s HDL a few points, there are drugs currently in development which may raise it more substantially. Whether or not they would actually improve healthy aging remains to be seen. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. (Thursday, February 24, 2011)

 

PBS NewsHour's The Rundown blog interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study indicating that a dwarfism gene may provide protection against diabetes, cancer and other age-related diseases. The study focuses on a family in Ecuador whose members carry a gene that prevents the body from using growth hormone, a condition that leads to dwarfism. Dr. Barzilai notes that in nature, dwarf models live longer — small dogs live longer than large dogs, ponies longer than horses — and that this study represents an important finding in aging research. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. (Thursday, February 17, 2011)

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Los Angeles Times

 

NOVA scienceNow interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his research on more than 500 centenarians in a segment on the FOXO gene and its role in aging. He notes that the FOXO gene has been linked to longevity in multiple studies. The segment also includes interviews with several of the participants in Dr. Barziali's ongoing longevity study. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging (interview begins 9 minutes into the segment). For more on Dr. Barzilai's research, visit www.SuperAgers.com (Thursday, January 27, 2011)

 

The New York Daily News interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and researcher William Greiner, R.N., M.S., regarding the Longevity Genes Project, a genetics study of 500 centenarians, about the role genes play in longevity. Dr. Barzilai notes that the centenarians in the study seem to have genetic traits that delay age-related diseases. The story also profiles several of the participants in the Longevity Genes Project and highlights SuperAgers.com, a new website about the study. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of both the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. (Monday, November 22, 2010)

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Huffington Post
Crain's New York
Jewish Week

 

As part of a feature story on centenarians, the New York Times notes research by Nir Barzilai, M.D., on the role genes play in longevity. Dr. Barzilai's research has found that centenarians are 20 times as likely as the average person to have at least one long-lived relative. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of both the Institute for Aging Research and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. (Tuesday, October 19, 2010)

 

Der Spiegel, Germany's leading weekly news magazine, interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., regarding his genetics research on centenarians. Dr. Barzilai notes that these "super agers" are genetically in a class by themselves, since environmental and lifestyle factors do not appear to affect their longevity. The story also profiles several of the participants in his study of more than 500 centenarians and their offspring discussing their extraordinarily long lives. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Friday, September 24, 2010)

 

The New York Times interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study published in Science that identifies a set of 150 genetic variants that predicts extreme longevity with 77 percent accuracy. Dr. Barzilai notes that these genes provide protection against all the diseases of old age, a more powerful strategy than tackling each disease one by one. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research and director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research. (Thursday, July 01, 2010)

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CNN.com
Wall Street Journal
Newsweek
Los Angeles Times
Alzheimer's Research Forum
The Week
Sacramento Bee
The Scientist (quoting Jan Vijg, Ph.D.)
BusinessWeek (quoting Robert Marion, M.D.)
Macleans (Canada)

 

The Daily Telegraph (UK) interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., on his research with centenarians and their genetic make-up, which allows many of them to lead "unhealthy" lifestyles and still live to 100. Dr. Barzilai notes that those who live extraordinarily long lives are genetically protected from the effects of environmental factors, like smoking and a poor diet. He is in the UK to address the Royal Society in London on aging and treating age-related diseases. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Tuesday, May 11, 2010)

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Daily Express
Irish Herald
The Sun (UK)
The Times (UK)
BBC Mundo (in Spanish)
The Jewish Chronicle
Marie Claire (UK)

 

The Daily Mail (UK) profiles Nir Barzilai, M.D., his discovery of the first human "longevity genes," and the new BBC documentary featuring his research and its treatment implications. BBC Horizon interviews Dr. Barzilai, who discusses his work and new medications developed based on it, which are intended to provide protection against age-related diseases and extend life span. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Tuesday, February 02, 2010)

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The Telegraph (UK)
The Sun (UK)
Daily Mirror (UK)
Economic Times (India)
Marie Claire (UK)

 

MSN features research by Nir Barzilai, M.D., that identifies a potential new drug target for diabetes. The article, originally by Healthday, reports that humanin, which may prevent nerve cells from dying, may also help to improve insulin action and lower blood glucose levels. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research and the director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Wednesday, July 22, 2009) read more...

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United Press International (UPI)

 

TheScientist.com interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a Nature study that sheds light on how diet restriction might boost life span. The study shows that a single pair of proteins, whose activity is linked to diminished food intake, is responsible for significantly increasing the lifespan of worms. In the article, Dr. Barzilai remarks on the importance of the study and its impact on future research. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research and the director of the Institute for Aging Research. (Wednesday, June 24, 2009) read more...

 

The New York Times interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D. for a front page story on a decades-long study of the health and mental acuity of individuals over 90 years old. The California study has looked at more than 14,000 people over the age of 65, including 1,000 people over the age of 90. Study results indicate that daily mental activities as well as social interactions may reduce the risk of dementia. Dr. Barzilai recently published research on the role of genetics in extreme longevity. Dr. Barzilai is director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research. (Friday, May 22, 2009) read more...

 

U.S. News & World Report interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D. on new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showing that older people with type 2 diabetes and who have been hospitalized for severe low blood sugar may have a greater risk of developing dementia. While 32 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk for dementia, the study does not prove any cause-and-effect link between the two conditions, according to Dr. Barzilai. Dr. Barzilai is director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research and heads the Longevity Genes Project. (Tuesday, April 14, 2009) read more...

 

Forbes features comments by Nir Barzilai, M.D. on the role of genetics in extreme longevity. The article cites Dr. Barzilai's identification of a protein that, when present, may protect centenarians against Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. Dr. Barzilai is director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research and heads the Longevity Genes Project. (Tuesday, April 07, 2009) read more...

 

USA Today interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., on a story exploring the potential link between diabetes and cognitive decline. Dr. Barzilai is director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research and heads the Longevity Genes Project. (Wednesday, January 28, 2009) read more...

 

The New York Times interviews Dr. Nir Barzilai, on research showing older adults whose parents live to be 100 or longer have dramatically lower risks of heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. Dr. Barzilai is director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research and heads the Longevity Genes Project. (Monday, November 24, 2008) read more...

 

Scientific American interviews Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research, on genetic variables that contribute to long life. The article, entitled "Is 100 the New 80?" helps explain why some people live to age 100 and beyond. (Tuesday, October 28, 2008) read more...

 

The Wall Street Journal interviews Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein's Institute for Aging, and Dr. Jan Vijg, professor and chair of genetics, in article entitled "Secrets of the Wellderly." (Friday, September 19, 2008) read more...

 

The Chicago Tribune includes comments from Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein's Institute for Aging, in a story about longevity, that also notes his discovery of four genes that lend clues to why some individuals live to 100 and beyond. (Monday, September 15, 2008) read more...

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