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Einstein in the Media

American Medical News interviews Robert Marion, M.D., about prenatal whole genome sequencing, which can identify an unborn child’s risk of developing chronic diseases. Because this new test will provide detailed information on mutations of 20,000 to 25,000 genes, some of which will not be significant, Dr. Marion stresses the importance of preparing healthcare professionals to counsel expectant parents about the results. Dr. Marion is director of Einstein’s Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and chief of developmental medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, August 27, 2012)

 

ABCNews.com interviews Robert Marion, M.D., about surprising new research that finds drinking alcohol in moderation during pregnancy is safe. Dr. Marion, who advises that women refrain from drinking alcohol while pregnant, notes that it is riskiest during the first trimester. Dr. Marion is director of Einstein’s Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and chief of developmental medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, June 20, 2012)

 

The New York Daily News interviews Robert Marion, M.D., and Steven Walkley, D.V.M., Ph.D., about Einstein’s leap year event showcasing the talents of young people with rare diseases in order to raise awareness of their conditions. The event will highlight the abilities of the participants and encourage partnerships among researchers to help find much-needed treatments. Dr. Marion is chief of genetics and developmental medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Walkley is director of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center at Einstein. (Wednesday, February 29, 2012)

 

ABCNews.com interviews Robert Marion, M.D., about Trisomy 18, the rare genetic disorder that recently sent the 3-year-old daughter of GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum to the hospital. Dr. Marion notes that most children with Trisomy 18 die in the first three months of life, and only 10 to 20 percent survive past the first year. He is chief of genetics and developmental medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, January 30, 2012)

 

Wall Street Journal interviews Robert Marion, M.D., about the Montefiore-Einstein Center for CardioGenetics, which uses genetic testing to identify families at risk for sudden cardiac death. The testing is particularly important when family members die of sudden death. Testing can be offered to the relatives of the deceased to assess their risk and offer treatment if hereditary components of Long QT Syndrome are identified. Dr. Marion is professor of genetics and director of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for CardioGenetics. (Tuesday, July 13, 2010)

 

CBS News (via WebMD) interviews Robert Marion, M.D., on concerns about over-the-counter genetic tests, which analyze an individual's genetic risk for certain diseases and medical conditions. Dr. Marion notes that while the availability of genetic tests is a positive medical advancement, it is extremely difficult to interpret the results and argues that genetic counseling should be required. Dr. Marion is the Ruth L. Gottesman Chair in Developmental Pediatrics and director of the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center. (Friday, May 14, 2010)

 

U.S. News & World Report interviews Robert Marion, M.D., on a new genetic test, chromosomal microarray analysis, which identified genetic abnormalities in about 7 percent of people with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Marion explains that autism is not one syndrome caused by a singular genetic mutation, but a little-understood collection of problems that affect the way the brain works. Dr. Marion is the Ruth L. Gottesman Chair in Developmental Pediatrics and director of the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein, and director of clinical genetics at Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, March 16, 2010)

 

BusinessWeek (via HealthDay) interviews Robert Marion, M.D., on a new study that identifies the first gene mutations linked to stuttering, estimated to account for 9 percent of cases. Dr. Marion notes that if children with these mutations could be identified, they could enter speech therapy early in life, possibly preventing stuttering from developing. Dr. Robert Marion is director of the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein and director of the Center for Congenital Disorders at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, February 11, 2010)

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CNN interviews Thomas McDonald, M.D., and Robert Marion, M.D., about the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics. A genetic disease, know as Long QT Syndrome, is thought to be responsible for as much as 20% of Sudden Infant Deaths (SIDS) and 30% of unexpected deaths in older children and adults. Researchers can now test for the disease and provide treatment. (Tuesday, October 20, 2009)

 

CBS Evening News with Katie Couric speaks with Dr. Robert Marion, director of the Children's Rehabilitation and Evaluation Center about Down's Syndrome. (Wednesday, September 10, 2008) watch video...

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