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Einstein in the Media

The New Yorker reports on the growing concern about concussions in soccer. Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his research on head injury in amateur players from heading. Dr. Lipton’s studies have found that repeated, deliberate sub-concussive hits from heading damages the brains of players and leads to cognitive and memory problems. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, October 02, 2014)

 

CBSNews.com interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about the FDA consumer alert for dietary supplements that falsely claim to prevent or cure concussions. Dr. Lipton notes that such claims may lead people to be less careful than they should and that the best way to prevent a concussion is to not have a head injury. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, August 27, 2014)

 

New York Times' "Room for Debate,” on online op-ed section, included a contribution from Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., on a new campaign to limit heading by youth soccer players. The discussion was sparked by a campaign launched by former Women’s U.S. National Soccer Team players who recommend heading be banned until players reach high school. The New York Times coverage on the campaign cited Dr. Lipton’s research on the impact of heading on amateur soccer players. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, June 30, 2014)

 

The Boston Globe highlights research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., on the long-term impact of repetitive heading in soccer on the brain. Dr. Lipton explains that with lower levels of heading, the brain may be able to repair itself in most players. However, there appears to be a tipping point—approximately 1,800 headers per year—where trauma results in long-term problems, such as memory loss. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, May 19, 2014)

 

The Economist cites research led by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that found those who frequently headed the ball in soccer had brain abnormalities similar to those found in patients with concussions. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Saturday, April 12, 2014)

 

The New York Times quotes Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about his research on the impact of heading on soccer players. The article focuses on the first conclusive case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (C.T.E.) in a soccer player. Former New Mexico player, Patrick Grange, 29, died last April of ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, February 26, 2014)

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ABC News

 

CNN interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about his Radiology study that found frequent heading in soccer impacts brain function. Dr. Lipton notes that excessive sub-concussive hits to the head – rather than more serious concussions – may be the culprit for the brain injury he found in his study participants. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, June 12, 2013)

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Los Angeles Times
CBSNews.com
CBS News Radio (audio interview begins at 5:15 minutes)
U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay)
DiscoveryNews.com
The Telegraph (UK)
Times of India
MedPage Today
FoxNews.com
Self.com
WABC-TV
Science News
UPI
Voice of America
National Geographic
Huffington Post
Reuters Television
WPIX-TV (New York)

 

NY1 interviews Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., about his ongoing research into whether “heading” in soccer may cause brain injury. Dr. Lipton notes that some amount of heading seems to be safe, although there is a threshold at which heading becomes dangerous. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, April 17, 2013)

 

Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., explains on NBC Nightly News the concern that “heading” in soccer may increase long-term risk for degenerative brain disease. Dr. Lipton was interviewed about a new study that used a specially designed tablet app to measure cognitive function and reflexes in a small group of female high school soccer players and non-athletes. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, March 04, 2013)

 

The Wall Street Journal features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that uses a special MRI technique to predict long-term prognosis after a concussion. Dr. Lipton notes that most but not all concussion patients get better by themselves and his research could help identify which patients need to be watched. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Tuesday, November 20, 2012)

 

ABCNews.com features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that outlines a new technique for detecting concussion. Dr. Lipton notes that the findings may not only identify patients who sustain concussions but also provide guidance on the most effective treatments. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, June 08, 2012)

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U.S. News & World Report
CBC Radio (Canada)
FoxNews.com

 

The New York Times features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that shows frequent "heading" in soccer may lead to brain injury and memory loss in amateur players. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, December 13, 2011)

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Bloomberg Businessweek
Scientific American
BBC News
Globe & Mail/Canadian Press
Telegraph (UK)
Daily Mail (UK)
WebMD
FoxNews.com
The Press Association (UK)
The Mirror (UK)
The Herald (Scotland)
The Sun (UK)
CTV.ca
Der Spiegel (Germany)
El Mundo (Spain)
Hechos de Hoy (Spain)
Aksam (Turkey)
Haberdar (Turkey)
Terra (Peru)
Blick (Switzerland)
CBSNews.com
G1 (Brazil)
Huffington Post
Education Week
New York Post
UPI
WCAU-TV (Philadelphia)
The Boston Globe's "Daily Dose" blog
The Los Angeles Times's "Booster Shots" blog
HeathDay
Redaccion/SINC (Spain)
The Atlantic
CBS-TV Chicago
Los Angeles Times
BBC (Dr. Lipton’s interview begins at 14:40)
JAMA
Education Week's "Schooled in Sports" blog

 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. on a method to detect brain damage after concussions. The article, originally by Healthday, reports that diffusion tensor imaging, the brain scanning method used, could help in diagnosing concussions and in assessing the effectiveness of treatments. Dr. Lipton is associate director of Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center. (Friday, August 28, 2009)

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