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Einstein in the News

Nature interviews Zev Williams, M.D., Ph.D., about his placental miRNA research, which he hopes will lead to an early-warning test for pre-eclampsia. Dr. Williams is assistant professor of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health and of genetics at Einstein and director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss (PEARL) at Einstein and Montefiore Health System.

(Thursday, February 23, 2017)

 

The Washington Post interviews Dr. Zev Williams about the possibility that Zika infections in pregnant women can cause miscarriage. While health officials have not previously linked the virus to miscarriage, the CDC reports that two U.S. women who contracted Zika while traveling out of the country miscarried after returning home, and the virus was found in their placentas. Dr. Williams notes that while it is certainly possible for an infection – either viral or bacterial – to cause a miscarriage, it has not yet been determined if the Zika virus caused it in these cases. Dr. Williams is director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System.

(Friday, February 12, 2016)

 

The New York Times interviews Zev Williams, M.D., Ph.D., about a study that investigated the use of progesterone therapy to prevent miscarriage. The researchers found that giving the hormone did not improve the chance a woman with a history of miscarriage will carry a pregnancy to term. Dr. Williams notes that no amount of progesterone can help in cases where the fetus has chromosomal abnormalities, which is the most common cause of miscarriage. Dr. Williams is director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System.

(Wednesday, December 02, 2015)

 

The Wall Street Journal interviews Zev Williams, M.D., Ph.D., about his research into new methods to monitor the health of the placenta during pregnancy. Dr. Williams is developing a non-invasive method that will measure the RNA that is continuously released by the placenta into the mother’s bloodstream. The goal is to detect problems with the placenta early, when interventions could be effective. Dr. Williams is director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System.

(Tuesday, November 03, 2015)

 

The Huffington Post quotes Zev Williams, M.D., Ph.D., about the guilt and shame many women feel following a miscarriage. He notes that a vast majority of miscarriages are caused by genetic problems in the fetus, not a woman’s behavior. Dr. Williams’ comments are based on his research and appear in an article about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement that he and his wife experienced miscarriages before their current pregnancy. Dr. Williams is director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System.

(Wednesday, August 19, 2015)

 

Wall Street Journal features Zev Williams. M.D., Ph.D., and the Einstein-Montefiore program for recurrent miscarriage, which links clinical care to an NIH-funded lab. Dr. Williams and his colleagues in the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss (PEARL) investigate the genetic causes of recurrent miscarriage, which occurs in about 5 percent of couples. Dr. Williams is associate professor of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health and of genetics at Einstein and director of PEARL at Einstein and Montefiore.

(Monday, June 15, 2015)

 

NPR’s Shots blog features research by Zev Williams, M.D., Ph.D., that revealed widespread misperceptions about miscarriage. In a survey of more than 1,000 Americans, he and his team found that most people think miscarriage is rare, and many believe that a woman who loses a pregnancy brought it upon herself. Neither of those things is true. Dr. Williams is director of the Program for Early and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss at Einstein and Montefiore Health System.

(Friday, May 08, 2015)

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