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Einstein in the Media

The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about why more women than men develop Alzheimer’s disease. Research from Dr. Lipton’s Einstein Aging Study found that women, ages 70 to 79, were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia as men of the same age, but that after the age of 80 the risk is similar for both genders. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, September 04, 2014)

 

The New York Times interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about research from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS) which found an association between perceived stress and dementia. As part of two separate EAS studies, participants were surveyed about perceived stress. For healthy participants, cognitive loss was associated with scoring highest for stress and anxiety over a four-year period while the risk of dementia was two-and-a-half times greater for participants who had amnestic mild cognitive impairment and the highest perceived stress. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, July 16, 2014)

 

Bloomberg features new research by Richard Lipton, M.D., and Mindy Katz, M.P.H., finding early memory loss doubles the risk of dying. Ms. Katz notes the importance of detecting early Alzheimer’s symptoms since it may help reduce the risks of illness that lead to premature death. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center and director of the Einstein Aging Study. Ms. Katz is senior associate in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and Montefiore.

(Tuesday, July 17, 2012)

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Los Angeles Times
USA Today
U.S. News & World Report

 

U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay) interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., on a new study linking migraine to depression in women. Dr. Lipton notes the large number of participants and the length of time they were followed make the findings important, but identifies some drawbacks of the study, including that it didn’t include women under 45 and that the depression was self-reported. Dr. Lipton is vice chair of neurology at Einstein and director of Montefiore’s Headache Center. (Thursday, February 23, 2012)

 

Time interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study that links eating baked or broiled fish one or more times a week with a lowered risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Lipton notes that the there may be other factors associated with fish consumption – like more exercise or lower calorie intake – that researchers did not take into account. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study. (Thursday, December 01, 2011)

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USA Today (via HealthDay)

 

AARP.com interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study finding that the more minor health problems a person develops not traditionally associated with brain health – such as loose dentures, sinus congestion and arthritis – the more likely they are to develop Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Lipton is vice chair and professor of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study. (Thursday, July 28, 2011)

 

The Wall Street Journal interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about the causes of and treatments for tension-type headaches. He notes that people who are depressed have increased rates of headaches, and people who have frequent headaches often become depressed. Dr. Lipton is vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the Montefiore Headache Center. (Tuesday, March 22, 2011)

 

ABC News interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study that demonstrates multilingual individuals are significantly more likely to avoid cognitive problems late in life than those who speak only two languages. Dr. Lipton notes that this study reinforces the "use it or lose it model of cognitive function" that has been gaining ground in recent years. His own work has shown that activities such as chess, bridge and doing crossword puzzles appeared to protect against Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Lipton cautions that all of these studies show an association between mental activity and staving off dementia, but they do not demonstrate causality. Dr. Lipton is vice chair and professor of The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study. (Thursday, February 24, 2011)

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U.S. News & World Report (via Healthday)

 

MSN (via HealthDay) features comments by Richard Lipton, M.D., regarding a new study that suggests hearing loss in adulthood is associated with a higher risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Lipton notes that there are several possible explanations for the link, including that hearing loss is an indication that an individual may not be aging well. Dr. Lipton is the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease, vice chair and professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the director of the Einstein Aging Study. (Tuesday, February 15, 2011)

 

ABC News features comments by Richard Lipton, M.D., on the slow progress toward finding advances in prevention and treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Lipton points out that part of the problem lies with researchers not being able to identify which mechanisms in the brain to target when studying potential treatments. The brains of Alzheimer's disease patients show many changes, and researchers cannot be sure which changes are the earliest and most important. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and the director of the Montefiore Headache Unit. (Friday, October 22, 2010)

 

Good Housekeeping highlights two separate studies by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers in a new feature article on what causes headaches. One Einstein survey of 20,000 Americans found that half of those who got migraines had never received a diagnosis, which is a key step toward reducing and preventing pain. In another Einstein study of 245 migraine sufferers, 68% of those who took doses of the herbal product butterbur twice a day cut their migraines by at least half. Both studies were led by Richard Lipton, M.D., professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology. (Monday, August 09, 2010)

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San Francisco Chronicle

 

USA Today features comments by Richard Lipton, M.D., on a recently released study that shows a possible correlation between cardiac index - the measure of how well the heart is pumping blood to the brain - and a person's risk for developing dementia. Though doctors have long known that heart disease is a risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's, Dr. Lipton notes that this study has contributed to our understanding because it included people who did not have heart disease. Low cardiac index is tied to having a smaller brain volume - equivalent to about two years of brain aging compared with having a high cardiac index. Dr. Lipton is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology. (Tuesday, August 03, 2010)

 

U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay) features research by Richard Lipton, M.D., which found that a new hand-held device that delivers a magnetic pulse to the back of the head could become an alternative to drug treatment for people with migraine with aura. The study, published in The Lancet Neurology, shows that 39 percent of migraine sufferers who used the device reported no pain after 2 hours, compared to 22 percent of those who were given a fake device. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair in The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and directs the Headache Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Friday, March 05, 2010)

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BBC (UK)
Time Magazine’s Wellness Blog
Telegraph (UK)
WebMD
Mirror (UK)
CTV News (Canada)
WCBSTV

 

The Telegraph (UK) quotes Richard Lipton, M.D., on his new research that finds migraine sufferers are twice as likely to have heart attacks as people without migraine. The study, published in the journal Neurology, also found that migraine sufferers are at higher risk of stroke and were more likely to have other problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair in The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and directs the Headache Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, February 11, 2010)

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Business Week (via HealthDay)
Reuters
The Times of India
WebMD
UPI

 

Reuters features research by Richard Lipton, M.D., and his colleagues that finds a "longevity gene" prevents memory decline and Alzheimer's disease. The study, published in JAMA, found there was a 70 percent reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's in people with two copies of the favorable variant of the "longevity gene" compared to those with the more common variant. Dr. Lipton is the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and professor and vice chair in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology. (Wednesday, January 13, 2010)

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Daily Mail (UK)
Daily Telegraph (UK)
Scientific American "Observations" blog
Bloomberg
MSN Health & Fitness (original Healthday)
U.S. News & World Report (original ScienceNews)
MedPage Today
WebMD
Globe and Mail (Canada)
Scientific American

 

NPR's "Morning Edition" interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., on a new study with blind patients that reveals how bright light can intensify the pain of migraine headaches. Scientists discovered a pathway from light-sensitive cells in the retina, which do not contribute to vision, to the area of the brain that's involved in migraine pain. Dr. Lipton explains how this research may help explain how a range of other sensory factors can increase headache pain. He is professor and vice chair in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and the director of the Montefiore Headache Center. (Monday, January 11, 2010)

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Business Week
Palm Beach Post

 

ABC News interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., on a new study that suggests people with a common gene variation can show early signs of the possible onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Although the study shows promise, Dr. Lipton is points out that not everyone with this particular ApoE4 gene variation will develop Alzheimer’s. Dr. Lipton is professor of the Saul R. Korey department of neurology at Einstein. (Thursday, July 16, 2009) read more...

 

NPR Morning Edition interviews Richard Lipton, M.D. on a new study published in Neurology that shows that environmental factors, particularly a spike in temperature, can trigger migraines. The study tracked thousands of patients who visited a Boston emergency room with severe headaches. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of neurology at Einstein, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. (Thursday, March 12, 2009) read more...

 

MSNBC highlights research by Richard Lipton, M.D., on the link between migraines and strokes. In the study, completed in 2008, researchers discovered that of the 175 long-term migraine sufferers studied, one-third had signs of blood vessel damage, almost five times higher than the control group. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of neurology at Einstein, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. (Monday, March 02, 2009) read more...

 

Reuters Health highlights new research by Dr. Richard Lipton showing half of people aged 70 or older suffer from chronic pain, with women and the obese being particularly vulnerable. The research appears in the latest issue of Journal of the American Geriatrics Society and derived from the Einstein Aging Study. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of neurology at Einstein, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. (Thursday, January 15, 2009) read more...

 

Associated Press, San Francisco Chronicle, Philadelphia Inquirer and others feature Dr. Richard Lipton, principal author of a study showing the use of commonly-used migraine medicines can make symptoms worse. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of neurology at Einstein, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. read more...

Medscape details a study showing the use of commonly used migraine medicines can make symptoms worse. The principal author of the study is Dr. Richard Lipton, Einstein professor and vice chair of neurology, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. The article appears as part of Medcape's Continuing Medical Education series. (Monday, December 22, 2008) read more...

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San Francisco Chronicle
Philadelphia Inquirer
Seattle Times
Chicago Sun Times
Chicago Tribune

 

Medscape details a study showing the use of commonly used migraine medicines can make symptoms worse. The principal author of the study is Dr. Richard Lipton, Einstein professor and vice chair of neurology, as well as director of the Montefiore Headache Center. The article appears as part of Medcape's Continuing Medical Education series. (Thursday, December 04, 2008) read more...

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