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Einstein in the Media

How much dietary salt is necessary? NBC’s “The Today Show” features research by Michael Alderman, M.D., that found current salt guidelines may be too low for most Americans. The collaborative study by Dr. Alderman and researchers at the Copenhagen University Hospital found that the average daily sodium intake of most Americans (between around 2,600 milligrams to 5,000 milligrams daily) is actually associated with better health outcomes than many current recommended guidelines (below 2,300 mg/day). Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine, and holds the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine.

(Wednesday, April 02, 2014)

 

In a New York Times article, Michael Alderman, M.D., applauds a new IOM report which found no rationale for sodium levels currently recommended by national guidelines. The expert committee, commissioned by the IOM at the behest of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, noted that below 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day, there is an absence of data in terms of the benefits, but there begin to be suggestions of harm in some groups. (Current national dietary guidelines are 1,500 mg a day.) Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine, and holds the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine.

(Wednesday, May 15, 2013)

 

USA Today interviews Michael Alderman, M.D., regarding growing concerns about the influence of the money provided by makers of drugs and medical devices on medical societies. Dr. Alderman objects strongly to some of the industry-funded practices occurring at the American Hypertension Society (AHS), a physicians group for which he was once president. Two years ago, the AHS teamed with its biggest donor, Daiichi Sankyo, the maker of hypertension drugs, to create a training program for drug company sales representatives. Graduating from the class, which costs $1,990 per person, allows them to put the AHS accreditation symbol on their business cards. Dr. Alderman calls the program “obscene.” Dr. Alderman is professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Friday, May 06, 2011)

 

The New York Times and Reuters interview Michael Alderman, M.D., and Hillel Cohen, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., about a new study that found low-salt diets increase the risk of death from heart attacks and strokes and do not prevent high blood pressure. Both Drs. Alderman and Cohen note that there is limited research on the link between sodium intake and the risk of heart disease and consumers should not change their salt intake based on the current findings. Dr. Alderman is professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. Dr. Cohen is professor of clinical epidemiology & population health. (Wednesday, May 04, 2011)

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Boston Globe

 

The Associated Press highlights a recent study by Michael Alderman, M.D., about new ways to treat hypertension that might help optimize patient care. The study found that measuring blood levels of the hormone renin may assist doctors in determining which blood pressure medicine their patients should take. The research also found that in some cases taking a drug that's a poor match to that hormone can actually trigger a spike in blood pressure. Dr. Alderman is professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Tuesday, September 07, 2010)

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Wall Street Journal
Bloomberg BusinessWeek

 

The Wall Street Journal features news of a study by Michael Alderman, M.D. which aims to help provide scientific guidelines to help doctors prescribe appropriate medication for high blood pressure. Doctors have known for years that patients with different physical characteristics respond differently to various hypertension drugs. Dr. Alderman's study focused on using the hormone renin as a biomarker for matching the correct drugs to the individual patient. Dr. Alderman is professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Tuesday, August 24, 2010)

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Businessweek

 

Reuters features news of a study by Michael Alderman, M.D., which found that for certain patients, commonly prescribed medications for hypertension actually raised their blood pressure. The elevations in blood pressure were the result of a mismatch between drugs and patient characteristics. The study showed that a blood test for a blood-pressure regulating hormone called renin may help doctors decide which blood pressure medicine their patients should take. The study appears in the August 19th edition of the American Journal of Hypertension. Dr. Alderman is professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Wednesday, August 18, 2010)

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ABCNews.com
Boston Globe

 

Science interviews Michael Alderman, M.D., about a new Institute of Medicine report that recommends the FDA require food manufacturers restrict added salt in their foods. Dr. Alderman argues that current and new salt-intake recommendations are not based on sound science and may have unintended consequences on public health. Dr. Alderman is professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Friday, April 23, 2010)

 

The New York Times interviews Michael Alderman, M.D., on new public health initiatives to lower the recommended level of dietary salt and reduce salt in restaurant and packaged foods. Dr. Alderman argues, as he did in a recent article in JAMA, that low-salt diets are not always associated with better clinical outcomes. Before changing policy, he advises a rigorous test of the low-salt diet in a randomized clinical trial. Dr. Alderman is professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health and the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Tuesday, February 23, 2010)

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Voice of America
Vancouver Sun (via Reuters)

 

The New York Times features comments from Michael Alderman, M.D., on a new national health initiative by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to reduce salt in restaurant and packaged foods. The initiative has set a goal of reducing salt used by food manufacturers and restaurant chains, not only in New York City but across the country, by up to 25 percent by 2015. Dr. Alderman feels such an initiative would be an uncontrolled experiment with the nation's health and could lead to unintended consequences. Dr. Alderman is professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health and is the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Monday, January 11, 2010)

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New York Post
New York Daily News
The Washington Post (Associated Press)
NewScientist
Forbes

 

New York Times interviews Michael Alderman, M.D. on Mayor Bloombergss new initiative to reduce salt intake by pressuring the food industry and restaurant chains to cut the salt content of their products. Dr. Alderman is a critic of the new policy and notes that the health effects of eating less salt are not known. He is professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health and is the Atran Foundation Professor of Social Medicine. (Monday, April 06, 2009) read more...

 

New York Times features an op-ed written by Dr. Michael Alderman advocating for more research on the effect of salt on the human body. Dr. Alderman is a professor of medicine and epidemiology & population health. (Friday, February 06, 2009) read more...

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