Media More Coverage

Einstein in the Media

NBC Nightly News interviews Joseph Sparano, M.D., about his study that found just being overweight increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence. Dr. Sparano notes that the link between obesity and cancer remains regardless of treatment and that reducing weight may reduce risk of recurrence. Dr. Sparano is professor of medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein and chief of the section of breast medical oncology at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care.

(Tuesday, August 28, 2012)

More coverage on this story

ABCNews.com
CBSNews.com
CBC News (Canada)
Reuters
Time.com
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
UPI
ABC (Spain)
El Mundo (Spain)

 

The Los Angeles Times interviews Joseph Sparano, M.D., in an article on the growing evidence linking obesity with increased risk of cancer and mortality.  Researchers estimate that approximately 14% of cancer deaths in men and 20% in women are due to individuals being overweight or obese. Dr. Sparano comments on the results of the Women’s Intervention Nutrition Study, which found that the risk of breast cancer recurrence dropped by 25% in patients who stuck to a low-fat diet. He notes that if those results were due to a drug rather than a diet, it would be considered an effective treatment. Dr. Sparano is professor of medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health and associate chair of oncology at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, March 07, 2011)

 

CNN.com interviews Dr. Joseph Sparano about the FDA's controversial decision to phase out the drug Avastin as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer. The FDA says Avastin's side effects outweigh potential benefits for those with metastatic cancer. Dr. Sparano notes the announcement still allows doctors to prescribe Avastin for metastatic breast cancer, but only for those who can afford it, rather than those who medically could benefit from it. The FDA announcement does not affect Avastin's status as an approved therapy for lung, kidney, colorectal and brain cancers. Dr. Sparano is professor of medicine (oncology) and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health. (Friday, December 17, 2010)

 

Bloomberg highlights research by Joseph Sparano, M.D., that found obese women who have a type of breast cancer fueled by estrogen are more likely to die of the disease than their slimmer peers. Dr. Sparano notes that breast cancer patients who are already overweight or obese should make an effort to avoid further weight gain and that they should get nutritional evaluations. Dr. Sparano is professor of medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health and associate chair of oncology at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, December 09, 2010)

More coverage on other stories