Einstein in the Media | U.S./Global

Nature interviews Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., about her research on autophagy, a critical cellular recycling process linked to numerous diseases. Dr. Cuervo’s numerous contributions in the field are detailed, including implicating faulty autophagy in Parkinson’s disease and discovering its role in regulating hunger in the brain and metabolism in the liver. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology, of anatomy and structural biology, and of medicine, co-director of the Institute for Aging Research, and holds the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases at Einstein. (Thursday, October 16, 2014)

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The New York Daily News interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the evolving Ebola epidemic and the risk of airline travel in light of news that someone who later tested positive for the virus traveled by air while infected. Dr. Chandran notes that there has never been a case when a person caught Ebola on an airplane. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology. (Thursday, October 16, 2014)

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CBS News interviews Chinazo Cunningham, M.D., M.S., about the growing problem of opioid painkiller abuse and addiction. Dr. Cunningham explains why opioid abuse has increased significantly in recent years, her research on bias on the part of doctors in prescribing and monitoring opioids, and how Einstein has a structured curriculum to teach future doctors how to treat addition. Dr. Cunningham is professor of medicine and family and social medicine at Einstein and associate chief of the division of general internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, October 13, 2014)

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WABC-TV interviews John Condeelis, M.D., about his imaging research that is helping to explain how cancer spreads from the primary tumor. Dr. Condeelis and his team found that normal immune cells, called macrophages, aid the tumor cells in cancer metastasis by directing the tumor cells toward blood vessels. By better understanding this process at the patient level, doctors can more accurately assess which patients need aggressive treatments and which patients can be spared those treatments. Dr. Condeelis is professor and co-chair of anatomy and structural biology and co-director of the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, and the Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research at Einstein. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

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The New York Times features new research by Elina Jerschow, M.D., that found medications are the cause of most fatal allergic reactions. Dr. Jerschow notes that antibiotics and radiocontrast agents used in imaging studies are the two top medicines responsible for allergic deaths. Dr. Jerschow is assistant professor of medicine at Einstein and director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

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The New Yorker reports on the growing concern about concussions in soccer. Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his research on head injury in amateur players from heading. Dr. Lipton’s studies have found that repeated, deliberate sub-concussive hits from heading damages the brains of players and leads to cognitive and memory problems. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, October 02, 2014)

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Time features research led by Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., suggesting that brain scans measuring how quickly children process sensory information could be used to diagnose autism. The study found the degree to which a child abnormally processed sights and sounds was directly correlated to the severity of autism symptoms. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics and the Muriel and Harold Block Faculty Scholar in Mental Illness. (Monday, September 22, 2014)

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Wall Street Journal interviews Judy Wylie-Rosett, Ph.D., about research that suggests artificial sweeteners may raise blood sugar levels by altering the body’s gut bacteria. Dr. Wylie-Rosett notes that the study is important since it is the first to examine how gut microbes contribute to processing real and fake sugars. Dr. Wylie-Rosett is head of the division of health promotion and nutrition research, and professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine at Einstein. (Thursday, September 18, 2014)

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Nature interviews Dean Hosgood, Ph.D., M.P.H, about his research on the environmental and genetic factors that lead to high rates of lung cancer in non-smoking Asian women. Dr. Hosgood notes that as smoking decreases, other factors will become a larger proportion of lung cancer cases, so investigating this phenomenon can help the wider population. Dr. Hosgood is assistant professor of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, September 15, 2014)

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CBSNews.com interviews Lisa Shulman, M.D., about a promising autism intervention program that helped resolve autism behaviors in the majority of 7-to-15-month-olds studied. Dr. Shulman calls the study “groundbreaking” and also outlines a few key behaviors parents should look out for, such as fixating for long periods on objects rather than faces. Dr. Shulman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics and director of infant and toddler services at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and an attending physician at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, September 09, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about why more women than men develop Alzheimer’s disease. Research from Dr. Lipton’s Einstein Aging Study found that women, ages 70 to 79, were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia as men of the same age, but that after the age of 80 the risk is similar for both genders. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, September 04, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Kami Kim, M.D., about research that finds the parasite Toxoplasma gondii can manipulate the behavior of its host by switching on genes in brain cells. Research by Dr. Kim has found that a number of pathogens, including leprosy, appear to use DNA methylation to turn genes on and off in the animal it infects. Dr. Kim is professor medicine, of microbiology & immunology and of pathology. (Friday, August 29, 2014)

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NY1 interviews Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., about his research on Ebola that focuses on developing antibodies to use as a possible treatment for all five strains of the virus. Dr. Lai notes that so far his lab has discovered antibodies that have proven protective in mice against the Sudan strain of the Ebola virus, but more research is required. Dr. Lai is associate professor of biochemistry. (Tuesday, August 19, 2014)

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USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program. (Friday, August 15, 2014)

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NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on the controversy surrounding research on dangerous lab-made pathogens. Following the mishandling of smallpox by the CDC, the potential exposure of CDC scientists to live anthrax and even the recent the spread of Ebola, biologists and others are calling on the National Academy of Sciences to provide guidance on when and under what conditions research using lab-manipulated pathogens should be allowed to move forward. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Dr. Casadevall’s interview begins at 4:38 in the audio version) (Wednesday, August 13, 2014)

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