Einstein in the Media | U.S./Global

NPR’s Shots blog interviews Karen Bonuck, Ph.D., about her study that found lack of sleep and sleep-disordered breathing doubled kids’ risk for obesity. Dr. Bonuck emphasizes the need to promote healthy sleep in children, noting, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure… Pun intended.” Dr. Bonuck is professor of family and social medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein. (Thursday, December 11, 2014)

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The New York Times and NPR feature Nir Barzilai, M.D., and one of his centenarian study participants in a joint article on aging. Dr. Barzilai notes that as a scientist, his goal isn’t to help people live longer, but to live healthier. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. (Wednesday, November 19, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Einstein medical student, Joseph Gotesman, and Michael Reichgott, M.D., Ph.D., about VetConnect, an organization to help homeless veterans. Since founding VetConnect to connect local, Bronx veterans to needed services, Mr. Gotesman’s grassroots initiative has helped several veterans get permanent housing and find employment. Mr. Gotesman, who is in his second-year at Einstein, is trying to expand the initiative to other states with high rates of homelessness among veterans. Dr. Reichgott is professor of medicine at Einstein. (Friday, November 14, 2014)

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Capital New York features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that examines the impact of repeated blast exposures on the brains of veterans. Dr. Lipton notes that more exposures result in increased abnormalities and worse symptoms. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, November 11, 2014)

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The Christian Science Monitor interviews Tia Powell, M.D., about the ethics and policies around the dying with dignity movement in light of Brittany Maynard’s decision to end her life due to terminal brain cancer. Dr. Powell notes that better and more universal access to palliative care is necessary before any new policies are made so as to ensure more vulnerable populations, such as minorities and lower-income families, do not choose assisted death due to financial concerns. Dr. Powell is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and the Einstein-Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics program. (Wednesday, November 05, 2014)

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Wall Street Journal interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Steven Walkley, D.V.M., Ph.D., about the connection between the rare genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Ebola. Dr. Chandran’s research suggests that the gene mutation responsible for NPC may offer protection against Ebola. Dr. Walkley notes that it is well-known that carriers of certain genetic diseases might have protection against other diseases, citing that carriers for sickle-cell disease might be protected against malaria. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology. Dr. Walkley is director of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center and professor of pathology, of neurology and of neuroscience at Einstein. (subscription only) (Monday, November 03, 2014)

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Nature interviews Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., about her research on autophagy, a critical cellular recycling process linked to numerous diseases. Dr. Cuervo’s numerous contributions in the field are detailed, including implicating faulty autophagy in Parkinson’s disease and discovering its role in regulating hunger in the brain and metabolism in the liver. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology, of anatomy and structural biology, and of medicine, co-director of the Institute for Aging Research, and holds the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases at Einstein. (Thursday, October 16, 2014)

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CBS News interviews Chinazo Cunningham, M.D., M.S., about the growing problem of opioid painkiller abuse and addiction. Dr. Cunningham explains why opioid abuse has increased significantly in recent years, her research on bias on the part of doctors in prescribing and monitoring opioids, and how Einstein has a structured curriculum to teach future doctors how to treat addition. Dr. Cunningham is professor of medicine and family and social medicine at Einstein and associate chief of the division of general internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, October 13, 2014)

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WABC-TV interviews John Condeelis, M.D., about his imaging research that is helping to explain how cancer spreads from the primary tumor. Dr. Condeelis and his team found that normal immune cells, called macrophages, aid the tumor cells in cancer metastasis by directing the tumor cells toward blood vessels. By better understanding this process at the patient level, doctors can more accurately assess which patients need aggressive treatments and which patients can be spared those treatments. Dr. Condeelis is professor and co-chair of anatomy and structural biology and co-director of the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, and the Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research at Einstein. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

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The New York Times features new research by Elina Jerschow, M.D., that found medications are the cause of most fatal allergic reactions. Dr. Jerschow notes that antibiotics and radiocontrast agents used in imaging studies are the two top medicines responsible for allergic deaths. Dr. Jerschow is assistant professor of medicine at Einstein and director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

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Time features research led by Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., suggesting that brain scans measuring how quickly children process sensory information could be used to diagnose autism. The study found the degree to which a child abnormally processed sights and sounds was directly correlated to the severity of autism symptoms. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics and the Muriel and Harold Block Faculty Scholar in Mental Illness. (Monday, September 22, 2014)

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Wall Street Journal interviews Judy Wylie-Rosett, Ph.D., about research that suggests artificial sweeteners may raise blood sugar levels by altering the body’s gut bacteria. Dr. Wylie-Rosett notes that the study is important since it is the first to examine how gut microbes contribute to processing real and fake sugars. Dr. Wylie-Rosett is head of the division of health promotion and nutrition research, and professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine at Einstein. (Thursday, September 18, 2014)

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Nature interviews Dean Hosgood, Ph.D., M.P.H, about his research on the environmental and genetic factors that lead to high rates of lung cancer in non-smoking Asian women. Dr. Hosgood notes that as smoking decreases, other factors will become a larger proportion of lung cancer cases, so investigating this phenomenon can help the wider population. Dr. Hosgood is assistant professor of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, September 15, 2014)

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CBSNews.com interviews Lisa Shulman, M.D., about a promising autism intervention program that helped resolve autism behaviors in the majority of 7-to-15-month-olds studied. Dr. Shulman calls the study “groundbreaking” and also outlines a few key behaviors parents should look out for, such as fixating for long periods on objects rather than faces. Dr. Shulman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics and director of infant and toddler services at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and an attending physician at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, September 09, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about why more women than men develop Alzheimer’s disease. Research from Dr. Lipton’s Einstein Aging Study found that women, ages 70 to 79, were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia as men of the same age, but that after the age of 80 the risk is similar for both genders. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, September 04, 2014)

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