Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

Medical Scientist Training Program

Thesis Defense

Featured Student

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Tsoni Peled

My favorite aspect of Einstein as a whole is the student-run free clinic, ECHO. As a first year, I worked at the front desk. As a second year, I took a position on the administrative board, which gave me invaluable experience in the issues involved in running a clinical practice. Now, while working on my thesis, I am concerned about keeping my clinical skills sharp, so I volunteer at the ECHO Free Clinic a few Saturdays a month.

 

The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) is one of the nation’s oldest. From the start, our goal has been to train a diverse group of outstanding students to become future leaders of academic medicine and medical research. Continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1964, the Einstein MSTP has 406 illustrious Alumni with careers spanning the spectrum from basic science research to clinical medicine and many variations in between.

Today, the Einstein MSTP is still unique. Larger than most other MSTPs, it fosters a strong academic and social community within the college. While large enough to be an independent academic unit, the program is still small enough to provide students with the individual attention their unique careers require.

The current training program recognizes that the successful physician-scientist training is not simply medical school plus graduate training. The program integrates MSTP-specific courses with medical and graduate courses, during the first two years of preclinical course work. Integration continues in the PhD thesis years through weekly involvement in the MSTP Continuity Clinic and monthly Clinical Pathological Conferences and MSTP Career Paths seminars.

Students have outstanding publications and residency placements.

Awards & Accomplishments

  • Kim Ohaegbulam, NIH NRSA F31 Individual Predoctoral Fellowship Award for a project entitled "Tumor expressed B7x accelerates disease and is a novel target for immunotherapy" (Sponsor, Xingxing Zang, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Jennifer Schloss, NIH NRSA F30 Individual Predoctoral Fellowship Award for a project entitled "Use of beta cell epitopes in preventing type 1 diabetes in humanized mice" (Sponsor, Teresa DiLorenzo, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Onyi Uchime, NIH NRSA F31 Individual Predoctoral Fellowship Award for a project entitled "Novel investigation of the mechanism of BAX modulation" (Sponsor, Evripidis Gavathiotis, Biochemistry)
  • Philip Campbell, NIH NRSA F31 Individual Predoctoral Fellowship Award for a project entitled "Polarized transport in nervous system development and disease in zebrafish" (Sponsor, Florence Marlow, Developmental and Molecular Biology)
  • Jaime Schneider, NIH NRSA F30 Individual Predoctoral Fellowship Award for a project entitled "The Role of Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy In Vivo" (Sponsor, Ana Maria Cuervo, Developmental and Molecular Biology)

 more awards 

Publications

  • Wijetunga NA, Delahaye F, Zhao YM, Golden A, Mar JC, Einstein FH, Greally JM. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences. Nat Comm. 2014 Oct 20
  • Mukherjee G, Chaparro RJ, Schloss J, Smith C, Bando CD, DiLorenzo TP. Glucagon-reactive Islet-infiltrating CD8 T Cells in NOD Mice. Immunology. 2014 Oct 21
  • Hartung O, Forbes MM, Marlow FL. Zebrafish vasa is required for germ-cell differentiation and maintenance. Mol Reprod Dev. 2014 Oct
  • Fremont R, Calderon DP, Maleki S, Khodakhah K. Abnormal high-frequency burst firing of cerebellar neurons in rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism. J Neurosci. 2014 Aug 27

more publications 

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Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)