Faculty - By Research Interest

Name
Contact Information
Research Information
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Behavioral

Streamson C. Chua, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

Streamson C. Chua, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine (Endocrinology)

We study the role of the hypothalamus is regulating metabolic processes, energy balance and ingestive behavior. These functions directly control the propensity to develop obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Insights into the neural network that mediates these functions are likely to lead to therapeutic modalities and treatments to these chronic diseases.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology

Our lab studies neural computation to advance understanding of how the brain produces perceptual experiences and guides behavior. We follow a highly interdisciplinary approach that combines theories of neural coding, advanced methods in machine learning and computer vision, psychophysics experiments, and in vivo electrophysiology through collaborations.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab works on neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases: this is directed at both efforts to better understand the still elusive critical pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie neuronal dysfunction; and the development of rational therapeutic strategies which over the years has included enzyme replacement, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, gene replacement and pharmacologic modalities. We also have a broad interest in the biology of microglia, particularly their roles in brain development and select pathologies.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

Research in our laboratory examines neural mechanisms underlying auditory perception of speech, music, and other complex sounds at the cortical level. Of particular interest are the neural processes that allow the brain to perceptually separate spectrally and temporally overlapping sounds in complex acoustic environments, e.g., speakers’ voices at a cocktail party. These neural processes are studied via electrophysiological recordings of neural activity in auditory cortex of awake, behaving non-human primates. Parallel collaborative and translational studies involving both non-invasive and intracranial electrophysiological recordings in humans aim at relating mechanisms of complex sound processing in animal models and humans.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include: age- and sex-specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis, therapy development for early life seizures, epileptic encephalopathies and post-traumatic epilepsy, pathogenesis and treatments of infantile spasms and Rett syndrome, role of GABA receptors and subcortical centers in brain development and epileptogenesis.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We aim to understand how experience and neuronal activity contribute to the differentiation of adult neural stem cells and the integration of adult-born neurons into functional circuits in the dentate gyrus. We also study how this neuronal maturation process is altered in disease.

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The Hébert lab has two main focuses. First, understanding how a simple sheet of neuroepithelial cells develops into the adult neocortex, the part of our brains that we use for our highest cognitive and perceptual functions. And second, devising methods for regenerating the principle neurons of the adult neocortex when they are lost.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The primary aim of this laboratory is to more fully understand neuronal and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental neuropsychiatric disorders.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interests revolve around the motor and non-motor functions of the cerebellum. At a basic science level, we seek to understand the computational principles of the cerebellar circuitry, and how the cerebellum interacts with other brain regions such as the basal ganglia, the brain's dopaminergic system, and the prefrontal cortex. At the clinical level our interests include movement disorders, psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum disorder, as well as the role of the cerebellum in addiction and addictive behavior.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology)

My lab employs neuroimaging and other biomarkers in human subjects and animal models to characterize mechanisms underlying brain dysfunction due to innate processes (e.g. aging) and environmental exposures (e.g., trauma). A key methodological focus of my work embraces and innovates multi-modality precision medicine approaches to assessment. Our highly interdisciplinary approach engages collaborators in biophysics, epidemiology, genetics, neurology, neuropsychology, radiology and sports medicine.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Developmental Medicine)

I am a Cognitive Neuroscientist with expertise in the use of psychophysics, high-density electrophysiology, and neuroimaging to probe the brain processes underlying perception and cognition in healthy and clinical groups. Much of my basic work is directed at understanding sensory perception, probing how the sensory systems interact in the brain to influence perception and behavior, and investigating how attention impacts these processes. My recent work focuses on the neurodevelopment of these perceptual and cognitive processes in typically developing children, and whether and how these processes are altered in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We study the neural basis of reward-seeking behavior, decision-making and drug addiction. Our research uses rodent behavioral models and methods including electrophysiology, pharmacology, and optogenetics in behaving animals. The goal of our work is to determine how neurons in the nucleus accumbens and related circuitry compute, and how their computations influence behavior.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We investigate how the brain becomes selective to relevant features of the auditory scene, through processing and learning. We use electrophysiological, computational, biochemical and behavioral techniques applied to avian species.

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine (Endocrinology)

I am interested in the systems neurobiology and physiology of energy balance, including appetitive and consummatory phases of ingestive behavior, thermogenesis , glucose homeostasis, and gut-brain communication. I am particularly interested in the identification nd characterization of sensory transducers and neural circuits that relay and integrate incoming information from target organs whose feedback helps determine when and how we eat.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying the processing and perception of complex sounds, speech and language. To accomplish these goals, my collaborators and I examine 1) electrocorticographic signals in patients undergoing surgical evaluation for medically intractable epilepsy, 2) scalp recordings in children and adults, and 3) detailed investigations of auditory cortical processing in non-human primates.

Jump to:

Cellular/Molecular

Myles Akabas, M.D., Ph.D.

Myles Akabas, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Physiology & Biophysics

Malaria parasite membrane transport physiology; mechanisms of purine and drug transport; development of novel antimalarial drugs that target the primary malaria purine import transporter

Thaddeus A. Bargiello, Ph.D.

Thaddeus A. Bargiello, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab investigates the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying voltage and chemical regulation of open probability and permeation of ion channels formed by the connexin gene family. We do so by combining direct structural solutions by single particle cryo-EM, with computational methods which include all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations, and electrophysiological characterizations. We have recently extended our studies to include solution of the atomic structure of electrical synapses formed by Cx36.

Michael V. L. Bennett, D.Phil.

Michael V. L. Bennett, D.Phil.

Distinguished Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Gap junctions and hemichannels are formed by Connexins and Pannexins/Innexins. How is gating controlled? How is formation and removal controlled? As passive elements, gap junctions can mediate most forms of short term plasticity. Formation and removal are longer lasting forms of plasticity. Stroke as an embolic or hemorrhagic event is a leading cause of death and disability. Global ischemia, associated with cardiac arrest, CO poisoning or near drowning, can induce delayed neuronal death. Pre-clinical animal studies indicate strategies and therapeutic targets for minimizing sequelae and improving recovery. Similarly, the effects of traumatic brain injury in animals can be minimized and reversed.

Pablo E. Castillo, M.D., Ph.D.

Pablo E. Castillo, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The main goal of my research program is to understand how neural activity controls the strength of synaptic connections in the brain -- a process known as synaptic plasticity -- and how dysregulation of this process contributes to brain disease states. To address these issues we utilize a combination of experimental approaches, including cellular electrophysiology, two-photon laser microscopy, optogenetics and a wide-range of molecular manipulations.

Streamson C. Chua, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

Streamson C. Chua, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine (Endocrinology)

We study the role of the hypothalamus is regulating metabolic processes, energy balance and ingestive behavior. These functions directly control the propensity to develop obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Insights into the neural network that mediates these functions are likely to lead to therapeutic modalities and treatments to these chronic diseases.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab works on neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases: this is directed at both efforts to better understand the still elusive critical pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie neuronal dysfunction; and the development of rational therapeutic strategies which over the years has included enzyme replacement, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, gene replacement and pharmacologic modalities. We also have a broad interest in the biology of microglia, particularly their roles in brain development and select pathologies.

Scott W. Emmons, Ph.D.

Scott W. Emmons, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Genetics

I am interested in how synaptic connections in the nervous system are molecularly specified. My lab studies this in the context of the connectomics of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system. We study the function of neural cell adhesion molecules in the establishment of connectivity in a defined neural network.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

I am interested in the functional organization of neuronal microcircuits. My interests are at the level of synaptic dynamics, intrinsic membrane properties and perturbations of these variables.

Anna Francesconi, Ph.D.

Anna Francesconi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular underpinnings of metabotropic glutamate receptor functions in the brain. We are specifically interested in understanding how signals downstream of metabotropic receptors are translated into functional and structural changes in synaptic connections, and how metabotropic signaling is orchestrated and spatially confined within neurons. We apply molecular, cellular, biochemical and imaging approaches to identify protein networks that mediate glutamate metabotropic functions under physiological conditions and in animal models of intellectual disability and autism.

Lloyd D. Fricker, Ph.D.

Lloyd D. Fricker, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Molecular Pharmacology

The Fricker lab is interested in peptides and the enzymes that produce and degrade these peptides. Animals lacking specific peptide-processing enzymes have phenotypes that include obesity, anxiety, depression, infertility, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration. Efforts are underway to identify the specific peptides involved in the various phenotypes caused by mutations within the peptide-processing enzymes.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include: age- and sex-specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis, therapy development for early life seizures, epileptic encephalopathies and post-traumatic epilepsy, pathogenesis and treatments of infantile spasms and Rett syndrome, role of GABA receptors and subcortical centers in brain development and epileptogenesis.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We aim to understand how experience and neuronal activity contribute to the differentiation of adult neural stem cells and the integration of adult-born neurons into functional circuits in the dentate gyrus. We also study how this neuronal maturation process is altered in disease.

David H. Hall, Ph.D.

David H. Hall, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

I concentrate on providing modern electron microscopic techniques to explore the details of normal and mutant anatomy of the nematode C. elegans. I generally work in collaboration with other C. elegans labs who require our expertise to solve interesting problems in cellular and developmental biology, including sensory reception, synaptic connectivity, mechanisms of cell death, and aging of the nervous system

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The Hébert lab has two main focuses. First, understanding how a simple sheet of neuroepithelial cells develops into the adult neocortex, the part of our brains that we use for our highest cognitive and perceptual functions. And second, devising methods for regenerating the principle neurons of the adult neocortex when they are lost.

Bryen A. Jordan, Ph.D.

Bryen A. Jordan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We study key proteins that mediate information exchange between neuronal synapses and the cellular nucleus. We found that the transport of RNA binding proteins into synapses follows the activity-dependent transport of synaptic components into the cellular nucleus. These processes are essential for input specific expression of synaptic plasticity.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interests revolve around the motor and non-motor functions of the cerebellum. At a basic science level, we seek to understand the computational principles of the cerebellar circuitry, and how the cerebellum interacts with other brain regions such as the basal ganglia, the brain's dopaminergic system, and the prefrontal cortex. At the clinical level our interests include movement disorders, psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum disorder, as well as the role of the cerebellum in addiction and addictive behavior.

Herbert M. Lachman, M.D.

Herbert M. Lachman, M.D.

Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The Lachman lab uses induced pluripotent stem cell technology and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to model schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. The lab is primarily interested in studying schizophrenia and autism genes that code for transcription factors and chromatin remodeling complexes.

Jorge N. Larocca, Ph.D.

Jorge N. Larocca, Ph.D.

Clinical Associate Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

Our main goal is to define the pathways involved in the transport of myelin proteins. Our studies are oriented to provide important knowledge necessary to understand the role of the oligodendrocyte membrane transport mechanisms in biogenesis of myelin, brain development, and neurological diseases. Certainly, disruption of the myelin sheath has severe consequence for the development and function of the brain. In a number of hereditary diseases deficiencies in the intracellular transport of membrane affect myelin biogenesis, causing deficient brain development and severe neurological symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying these pathologies remain unclear because transport pathways, and mechanisms involved in their regulation are unknown. Our studies are directed to address these deficiencies in the knowledge of the oligodendrocyte biology by both defined the pathways responsible for the movement of myelin proteins, and assessing the involvement of Rab proteins in the regulation and coordination of the transport pathways.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We study the neural basis of reward-seeking behavior, decision-making and drug addiction. Our research uses rodent behavioral models and methods including electrophysiology, pharmacology, and optogenetics in behaving animals. The goal of our work is to determine how neurons in the nucleus accumbens and related circuitry compute, and how their computations influence behavior.

Alberto E. Pereda, M.D., Ph.D.

Alberto E. Pereda, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Synaptic transmission; properties and plasticity of gap junction-mediated electrical synapses; functional interactions between chemical and electrical synapses. Synaptic plasticity at auditory afferents.

Eliana Scemes, Ph.D.

Eliana Scemes, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The Scemes’ Lab studies CNS disorders involving purinergic signaling and gap junctional communication. Projects are: Astrocyte gap junctions and the blood brain barrier; Glia-neuronal pannexins in epilepsy and pain.

Robert H. Singer, Ph.D.

Robert H. Singer, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology

We are interested in the role of mRNP transport, localization and translation in learning and memory. In order to investigate this we use sophisticated labeling and imaging approaches on cultured neurons and brains in living animals.

David C. Spray, Ph.D.

David C. Spray, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Role of gap junctions and Panx1 channels in pain generation; Neuron-glial interactions in sensory ganglia; Role of astrocyte gap junctions in control of BBB permeability

Vytautas Verselis, Ph.D.

Vytautas Verselis, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interest is in the study of connexin channel gating and permeability and investigation of the mechanistic basis for cochlear dysfunction in syndromic, sensorineural deafness caused by missense mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding the human connexin 26 gap junction protein.

Steven U. Walkley, Ph.D., D.V.M.

Steven U. Walkley, Ph.D., D.V.M.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My research is focused on the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of genetic diseases that impact the function of the endosomal-autophagosomal-lysosomal system of neurons. Our goal is to better understand pathogenesis and to use these insights to develop therapies for these disorders.  

R. Suzanne Zukin, Ph.D.

R. Suzanne Zukin, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The Zukin lab focuses on 3 main areas of research: the role of mTOR signaling at the synapse in mouse models of autism, epigenetic remodeling of synaptic NMDA receptors during postnatal development, and epigenetic regulation of brain AMPA receptors in animal model of ischemic stroke.

Jump to:

Clinical

Joseph C. Arezzo, Ph.D.

Joseph C. Arezzo, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

human multicenter clinical trials assessment of possible neurotoxicology or seizures in rats, dogs, monkeys (most work done off campus)

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab works on neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases: this is directed at both efforts to better understand the still elusive critical pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie neuronal dysfunction; and the development of rational therapeutic strategies which over the years has included enzyme replacement, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, gene replacement and pharmacologic modalities. We also have a broad interest in the biology of microglia, particularly their roles in brain development and select pathologies.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

Research in our laboratory examines neural mechanisms underlying auditory perception of speech, music, and other complex sounds at the cortical level. Of particular interest are the neural processes that allow the brain to perceptually separate spectrally and temporally overlapping sounds in complex acoustic environments, e.g., speakers’ voices at a cocktail party. These neural processes are studied via electrophysiological recordings of neural activity in auditory cortex of awake, behaving non-human primates. Parallel collaborative and translational studies involving both non-invasive and intracranial electrophysiological recordings in humans aim at relating mechanisms of complex sound processing in animal models and humans.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include: age- and sex-specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis, therapy development for early life seizures, epileptic encephalopathies and post-traumatic epilepsy, pathogenesis and treatments of infantile spasms and Rett syndrome, role of GABA receptors and subcortical centers in brain development and epileptogenesis.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interests revolve around the motor and non-motor functions of the cerebellum. At a basic science level, we seek to understand the computational principles of the cerebellar circuitry, and how the cerebellum interacts with other brain regions such as the basal ganglia, the brain's dopaminergic system, and the prefrontal cortex. At the clinical level our interests include movement disorders, psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum disorder, as well as the role of the cerebellum in addiction and addictive behavior.

Alan D. Legatt, M.D., Ph.D.

Alan D. Legatt, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

Technical and clinical aspects of intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. Studies of sensory evoked potentials, including identification of component generators and clinical applications. Localization of seizure foci and of eloquent cortical areas.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology)

My lab employs neuroimaging and other biomarkers in human subjects and animal models to characterize mechanisms underlying brain dysfunction due to innate processes (e.g. aging) and environmental exposures (e.g., trauma). A key methodological focus of my work embraces and innovates multi-modality precision medicine approaches to assessment. Our highly interdisciplinary approach engages collaborators in biophysics, epidemiology, genetics, neurology, neuropsychology, radiology and sports medicine.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Developmental Medicine)

I am a Cognitive Neuroscientist with expertise in the use of psychophysics, high-density electrophysiology, and neuroimaging to probe the brain processes underlying perception and cognition in healthy and clinical groups. Much of my basic work is directed at understanding sensory perception, probing how the sensory systems interact in the brain to influence perception and behavior, and investigating how attention impacts these processes. My recent work focuses on the neurodevelopment of these perceptual and cognitive processes in typically developing children, and whether and how these processes are altered in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Solomon L. Moshe, M.D.

Solomon L. Moshe, M.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include the pathogenesis and treatments of epileptic encephalopathies and other epilepsies, including post-traumatic epilepsy, role of subcortical networks in seizures, Rett syndrome

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying the processing and perception of complex sounds, speech and language. To accomplish these goals, my collaborators and I examine 1) electrocorticographic signals in patients undergoing surgical evaluation for medically intractable epilepsy, 2) scalp recordings in children and adults, and 3) detailed investigations of auditory cortical processing in non-human primates.

Jump to:

Computational

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology

Dr. Aviv Bergman is a Professor of, and the Founding Chairman of the Department of Systems & Computational Biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. His research program addresses conceptual aspects of evolution and evolutionary systems biology. Specifically, he focuses on the development of the mathematical language necessary to support precise qualitative phenomenology that can be used to express complex questions arising in evolutionary theory such as the nature and role of multilevel selection, and the evolution of robustness, hierarchy and modularity in biological networks.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology

Our lab studies neural computation to advance understanding of how the brain produces perceptual experiences and guides behavior. We follow a highly interdisciplinary approach that combines theories of neural coding, advanced methods in machine learning and computer vision, psychophysics experiments, and in vivo electrophysiology through collaborations.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

I am interested in the functional organization of neuronal microcircuits. My interests are at the level of synaptic dynamics, intrinsic membrane properties and perturbations of these variables.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interests revolve around the motor and non-motor functions of the cerebellum. At a basic science level, we seek to understand the computational principles of the cerebellar circuitry, and how the cerebellum interacts with other brain regions such as the basal ganglia, the brain's dopaminergic system, and the prefrontal cortex. At the clinical level our interests include movement disorders, psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum disorder, as well as the role of the cerebellum in addiction and addictive behavior.

Adam Kohn, Ph.D.

Adam Kohn, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab investigates how visual information is encoded and processed by populations of cortical neurons, and how this processing is affected by recent stimulus history, or adaptation. Our work thus addresses issues of neural coding, cortical plasticity, corticocortical signaling, and the neuronal basis of visual perception. Our experiments involve multielectrode recordings in early and midlevel visual areas of anesthetized and awake, behaving macaque monkeys, combined with computational methods and psychophysics.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We investigate how the brain becomes selective to relevant features of the auditory scene, through processing and learning. We use electrophysiological, computational, biochemical and behavioral techniques applied to avian species.

Deyou Zheng, Ph.D.

Deyou Zheng, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

The research areas of the lab are computational genomics and bioinformatics, with a strong focus on mining and interpreting large-scale genomic data (ie, bigdata science). The biological themes of our research are centered on the genetic and epigenetic regulations of early development, including neural development and and heart development, and their dysregulation in diseases.

Jump to:

Developmental

Praveen Ballabh, M.D.

Praveen Ballabh, M.D.

Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

My research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of brain injury produced by intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants and developing strategies to restore the development and function of brain in the survivors with IVH.

Hannes E. Buelow, Ph.D.

Hannes E. Buelow, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Genetics

Our lab is interested in dendrite and axon patterning and the development of neuronal connectivity, with a focus on extracellular matrices. To this end, we are using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as our preferred model organism.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Kostantin Dobrenis, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab works on neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases: this is directed at both efforts to better understand the still elusive critical pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie neuronal dysfunction; and the development of rational therapeutic strategies which over the years has included enzyme replacement, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, gene replacement and pharmacologic modalities. We also have a broad interest in the biology of microglia, particularly their roles in brain development and select pathologies.

Scott W. Emmons, Ph.D.

Scott W. Emmons, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Genetics

I am interested in how synaptic connections in the nervous system are molecularly specified. My lab studies this in the context of the connectomics of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system. We study the function of neural cell adhesion molecules in the establishment of connectivity in a defined neural network.

Anna Francesconi, Ph.D.

Anna Francesconi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular underpinnings of metabotropic glutamate receptor functions in the brain. We are specifically interested in understanding how signals downstream of metabotropic receptors are translated into functional and structural changes in synaptic connections, and how metabotropic signaling is orchestrated and spatially confined within neurons. We apply molecular, cellular, biochemical and imaging approaches to identify protein networks that mediate glutamate metabotropic functions under physiological conditions and in animal models of intellectual disability and autism.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include: age- and sex-specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis, therapy development for early life seizures, epileptic encephalopathies and post-traumatic epilepsy, pathogenesis and treatments of infantile spasms and Rett syndrome, role of GABA receptors and subcortical centers in brain development and epileptogenesis.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We aim to understand how experience and neuronal activity contribute to the differentiation of adult neural stem cells and the integration of adult-born neurons into functional circuits in the dentate gyrus. We also study how this neuronal maturation process is altered in disease.

David H. Hall, Ph.D.

David H. Hall, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

I concentrate on providing modern electron microscopic techniques to explore the details of normal and mutant anatomy of the nematode C. elegans. I generally work in collaboration with other C. elegans labs who require our expertise to solve interesting problems in cellular and developmental biology, including sensory reception, synaptic connectivity, mechanisms of cell death, and aging of the nervous system

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

The Hébert lab has two main focuses. First, understanding how a simple sheet of neuroepithelial cells develops into the adult neocortex, the part of our brains that we use for our highest cognitive and perceptual functions. And second, devising methods for regenerating the principle neurons of the adult neocortex when they are lost.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The primary aim of this laboratory is to more fully understand neuronal and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental neuropsychiatric disorders.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Developmental Medicine)

I am a Cognitive Neuroscientist with expertise in the use of psychophysics, high-density electrophysiology, and neuroimaging to probe the brain processes underlying perception and cognition in healthy and clinical groups. Much of my basic work is directed at understanding sensory perception, probing how the sensory systems interact in the brain to influence perception and behavior, and investigating how attention impacts these processes. My recent work focuses on the neurodevelopment of these perceptual and cognitive processes in typically developing children, and whether and how these processes are altered in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Solomon L. Moshe, M.D.

Solomon L. Moshe, M.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include the pathogenesis and treatments of epileptic encephalopathies and other epilepsies, including post-traumatic epilepsy, role of subcortical networks in seizures, Rett syndrome

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine (Endocrinology)

I am interested in the systems neurobiology and physiology of energy balance, including appetitive and consummatory phases of ingestive behavior, thermogenesis , glucose homeostasis, and gut-brain communication. I am particularly interested in the identification nd characterization of sensory transducers and neural circuits that relay and integrate incoming information from target organs whose feedback helps determine when and how we eat.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying the processing and perception of complex sounds, speech and language. To accomplish these goals, my collaborators and I examine 1) electrocorticographic signals in patients undergoing surgical evaluation for medically intractable epilepsy, 2) scalp recordings in children and adults, and 3) detailed investigations of auditory cortical processing in non-human primates.

Steven U. Walkley, Ph.D., D.V.M.

Steven U. Walkley, Ph.D., D.V.M.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My research is focused on the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of genetic diseases that impact the function of the endosomal-autophagosomal-lysosomal system of neurons. Our goal is to better understand pathogenesis and to use these insights to develop therapies for these disorders.  

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Systems

Joseph C. Arezzo, Ph.D.

Joseph C. Arezzo, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

human multicenter clinical trials assessment of possible neurotoxicology or seizures in rats, dogs, monkeys (most work done off campus)

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology

Dr. Aviv Bergman is a Professor of, and the Founding Chairman of the Department of Systems & Computational Biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. His research program addresses conceptual aspects of evolution and evolutionary systems biology. Specifically, he focuses on the development of the mathematical language necessary to support precise qualitative phenomenology that can be used to express complex questions arising in evolutionary theory such as the nature and role of multilevel selection, and the evolution of robustness, hierarchy and modularity in biological networks.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology

Our lab studies neural computation to advance understanding of how the brain produces perceptual experiences and guides behavior. We follow a highly interdisciplinary approach that combines theories of neural coding, advanced methods in machine learning and computer vision, psychophysics experiments, and in vivo electrophysiology through collaborations.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Donald S. Faber, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

I am interested in the functional organization of neuronal microcircuits. My interests are at the level of synaptic dynamics, intrinsic membrane properties and perturbations of these variables.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Yonatan I. Fishman, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

Research in our laboratory examines neural mechanisms underlying auditory perception of speech, music, and other complex sounds at the cortical level. Of particular interest are the neural processes that allow the brain to perceptually separate spectrally and temporally overlapping sounds in complex acoustic environments, e.g., speakers’ voices at a cocktail party. These neural processes are studied via electrophysiological recordings of neural activity in auditory cortex of awake, behaving non-human primates. Parallel collaborative and translational studies involving both non-invasive and intracranial electrophysiological recordings in humans aim at relating mechanisms of complex sound processing in animal models and humans.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

J. Tiago Goncalves, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We aim to understand how experience and neuronal activity contribute to the differentiation of adult neural stem cells and the integration of adult-born neurons into functional circuits in the dentate gyrus. We also study how this neuronal maturation process is altered in disease.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Noboru Hiroi, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The primary aim of this laboratory is to more fully understand neuronal and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental neuropsychiatric disorders.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Our interests revolve around the motor and non-motor functions of the cerebellum. At a basic science level, we seek to understand the computational principles of the cerebellar circuitry, and how the cerebellum interacts with other brain regions such as the basal ganglia, the brain's dopaminergic system, and the prefrontal cortex. At the clinical level our interests include movement disorders, psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum disorder, as well as the role of the cerebellum in addiction and addictive behavior.

Adam Kohn, Ph.D.

Adam Kohn, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My lab investigates how visual information is encoded and processed by populations of cortical neurons, and how this processing is affected by recent stimulus history, or adaptation. Our work thus addresses issues of neural coding, cortical plasticity, corticocortical signaling, and the neuronal basis of visual perception. Our experiments involve multielectrode recordings in early and midlevel visual areas of anesthetized and awake, behaving macaque monkeys, combined with computational methods and psychophysics.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Michael L. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology)

My lab employs neuroimaging and other biomarkers in human subjects and animal models to characterize mechanisms underlying brain dysfunction due to innate processes (e.g. aging) and environmental exposures (e.g., trauma). A key methodological focus of my work embraces and innovates multi-modality precision medicine approaches to assessment. Our highly interdisciplinary approach engages collaborators in biophysics, epidemiology, genetics, neurology, neuropsychology, radiology and sports medicine.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Sophie Molholm, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Developmental Medicine)

I am a Cognitive Neuroscientist with expertise in the use of psychophysics, high-density electrophysiology, and neuroimaging to probe the brain processes underlying perception and cognition in healthy and clinical groups. Much of my basic work is directed at understanding sensory perception, probing how the sensory systems interact in the brain to influence perception and behavior, and investigating how attention impacts these processes. My recent work focuses on the neurodevelopment of these perceptual and cognitive processes in typically developing children, and whether and how these processes are altered in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Saleem M. Nicola, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We study the neural basis of reward-seeking behavior, decision-making and drug addiction. Our research uses rodent behavioral models and methods including electrophysiology, pharmacology, and optogenetics in behaving animals. The goal of our work is to determine how neurons in the nucleus accumbens and related circuitry compute, and how their computations influence behavior.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Jose L. Pena, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

We investigate how the brain becomes selective to relevant features of the auditory scene, through processing and learning. We use electrophysiological, computational, biochemical and behavioral techniques applied to avian species.

Alberto E. Pereda, M.D., Ph.D.

Alberto E. Pereda, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Synaptic transmission; properties and plasticity of gap junction-mediated electrical synapses; functional interactions between chemical and electrical synapses. Synaptic plasticity at auditory afferents.

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Gary J. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine (Endocrinology)

I am interested in the systems neurobiology and physiology of energy balance, including appetitive and consummatory phases of ingestive behavior, thermogenesis , glucose homeostasis, and gut-brain communication. I am particularly interested in the identification nd characterization of sensory transducers and neural circuits that relay and integrate incoming information from target organs whose feedback helps determine when and how we eat.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Mitchell Steinschneider, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology

My research interests include elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying the processing and perception of complex sounds, speech and language. To accomplish these goals, my collaborators and I examine 1) electrocorticographic signals in patients undergoing surgical evaluation for medically intractable epilepsy, 2) scalp recordings in children and adults, and 3) detailed investigations of auditory cortical processing in non-human primates.

Elyse S. Sussman, Ph.D.

Elyse S. Sussman, Ph.D.

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

My laboratory investigates the neurobiological bases of auditory perception. We use a combination of behavioral and electrophysiological measures to study neural processes that contribute to the organization, storage, and perception of sound; to understand how competing sensory inputs are represented in the brain; and to gain a better understanding of how attention modifies neural activity.