Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Administration

Department Chair

Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D.
Kennedy, Room 903
Phone: 718-430-3794
Fax: 718-430-8821
k.khodakhah@einstein.yu.edu 

Department Administrator

Joan Frumkies
Kennedy, Room 906
718-430-2413
joan.frumkies@einstein.yu.edu 

 

Senior Grants Administrator

Amanda Flournoy
Kennedy, Room 907
718-430-2769
amanda.flournoy@einstein.yu.edu
 

 
 
 

Staff

Ms. Chelsea Pegues
Executive Assistant to Dr. Kamran Khodakhah, Chair
Kennedy, Room 905
718-430-2736
Dr. Khodakhah's Office (K903): 929-246-6713
chelsea.pegues2@einstein.yu.edu
 

Ms. JoAnn Leone
Departmental Secretary
Kennedy, Room 907
718-430-3223
joann.leone@einstein.yu.edu
 

Ms. Maria Trombetta
Departmental Secretary
Kennedy, Room 920
718-430-2100
maria.trombetta@einstein.yu.edu
 

 
 

Ms. Lisa Sivertsen
Departmental Secretary
Kennedy, Room 910
718-430-3618
lisa.sivertsen@einstein.yu.edu 

Ms. Jennifer Hardina-Stockhausen
Departmental Secretary
Kennedy, Room 920
718-430-2409
jennifer.hardina@einstein.yu.edu 

Mr. Maurice Volaski
Systems Administrator
Kennedy, Room 915A
718-430-3414
maurice.volaski@einstein.yu.edu 
 

 
 

Mr. Kevin Fisher
Image Analysis & Graphics Facility
Training and Education
Kennedy, Rooms 914 & 915J
718-430-8945 or 2455
kevin.fisher@einstein.yu.edu 

 
 

Recent News & Events

Event | Neuroscience Retreat - May 10th - 11th
The Neuroscience Retreat will be held from May 10th - May 11th, 2017 at the Edith Macy Conference Center. Additional information, including itinerary and poster signups has been posted here. Registrations are due April 19th....more

Publication | Dr. Kamran Khodakhah
New Target For Dystonia Therapy—Dystonia—when someone’s muscles contract uncontrollably—is the third most common movement disorder (after Parkinson’s and essential tremor), affecting about 250,000 Americans. Research and treatment for the most common inherited form of dystonia, called DYT1, has focused mainly on the basal ganglia region of the brain. But new animal research by Einstein scientists implicates a different part of the brainthe cerebellumas the site of the problem. The study, published in the February 15 online issue of eLife, was led by Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and the Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Neuroscience. He and his colleagues made their discovery after generating the first mouse model of DYT1 to exhibit the overt symptoms of dystonia seen in patients. Previous research in Dr. Khodakhah’s lab has shown that severing the link between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia might be an effective way to treat cerebellar-induced dystonias....more

more news and events

 

Contact Us

Rose F. Kennedy Center

1410 Pelham Parkway South

9th Floor

Bronx, NY 10461

Phone: 718-430-2408

Fax: 718-430-8821

 
 
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