Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Core/Shared Facilities

     The Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience maintains two research facilities that are available, at minimal charge, for use by all department members, as well as by members of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. Both cores provide instruction in the use of the facilities, assistance with the actual experiments and guidance in experimental design.

     One facility is the Animal Behavior Core, which has the equipment required for the quantitative assessment of rodent behavior in tests of cognition, sensorimotor performance, and affective function.

     The other facility is the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Core, which provides access to a wide range of imaging techniques, including confocal microscopy, two-photon laser microscopy, electron microscopy and laser capture, as well as expertise in image processing and presentation.

     To further compliment in-house lab equipment, the Kennedy Center Cellular and Molecular Shared Equipment Facility on the third floor, provides additional common experiment equipment (including western blot and gel scanners, scintillation counter, film developer and various shakers and centrifuges).

Recent News & Events

Event | Neuroscience Retreat - May 10th - 11th
The Neuroscience Retreat will be held from May 10th - May 11th, 2017 at the Edith Macy Conference Center. Additional information, including itinerary and poster signups has been posted here. Registrations are due April 19th....more

Publication | Dr. Kamran Khodakhah
New Target For Dystonia Therapy—Dystonia—when someone’s muscles contract uncontrollably—is the third most common movement disorder (after Parkinson’s and essential tremor), affecting about 250,000 Americans. Research and treatment for the most common inherited form of dystonia, called DYT1, has focused mainly on the basal ganglia region of the brain. But new animal research by Einstein scientists implicates a different part of the brainthe cerebellumas the site of the problem. The study, published in the February 15 online issue of eLife, was led by Kamran Khodakhah, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and the Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Neuroscience. He and his colleagues made their discovery after generating the first mouse model of DYT1 to exhibit the overt symptoms of dystonia seen in patients. Previous research in Dr. Khodakhah’s lab has shown that severing the link between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia might be an effective way to treat cerebellar-induced dystonias....more

more news and events

 

Contact Us

Rose F. Kennedy Center

1410 Pelham Parkway South

9th Floor

Bronx, NY 10461

Phone: 718-430-2408

Fax: 718-430-8821

 
 
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