Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

Grand Rounds

Explorations of Inner Self: The Human Microbiome in Health and Disease

Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine Grand Rounds

Thursday, April 25, 2013

8:00 AM: Forchheimer Medical Science Building 3rd Fl Lecture Hall

Speaker & Info

David Relman, MD
Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor
Departments of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology
Stanford University School of Medicine

Chief, Infectious Diseases
VA Palo Alto Health Care System

Co-Director, Center for International Security and Cooperation
Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Stanford University

Repeated at 12:15 pm, Cherkasky Auditorium, Montefiore Medical Center.

Dr. David A. Relman’s primary research focus is the human indigenous microbiota (microbiome), and in particular, the nature and mechanisms of variation in patterns of microbial diversity within the human body as a function of time, space, and in response to perturbation. His work was some of the first to employ modern molecular methods in the study of the microbiome, and currently includes studies of microbial community assembly, stability and function, at the time of birth, during pregnancy, and in relation to various forms of disturbance. 

During the past few decades, Dr. Relman’s research directions have also included pathogen discovery and the development of new strategies for identifying previously-unrecognized microbial agents of disease. As a consequence and reflection of these research interests, he has served as an advisor to the U.S. Government in matters pertaining to host-microbe interactions, emerging infectious diseases, and biosecurity. He co-chaired a widely-cited 2006 study by the National Academies of Sciences on “Globalization, Biosecurity, and the Future of the Life Sciences”, and served as vice-chair of a 2011 National Academies study of the science underlying the FBI investigation of the 2001 anthrax mailings. He currently serves as a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, Chair of the Forum on Microbial Threats at the Institute of Medicine (NAS), and President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). He received an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award in 2006, and was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 2011. 

Dr. Relman received a S.B. (Biology) from MIT (1977), M.D. (magna cum laude) from Harvard Medical School (1982), completed his clinical training in internal medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, served as a postdoctoral fellow in microbiology at Stanford University, and joined the faculty at Stanford in 1994.

Dr. Relman is the Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor in the Departments of Medicine, and of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University, and Chief of Infectious Diseases at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in Palo Alto, California. He is also Co-Director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. 

After attending this activity, participants will be able to: 

  • Appreciate the types of  bacteria and the nature of bacterial diversity within the human body
  • Understand how patterns of bacterial diversity vary according to human anatomic habitat, and according to individual human
  • Appreciate how the human microbiome assembles during early childhood
  • Recognize the kinds of roles that the microbiome may play in diseaseRepeated at 12:15 pm, Cherkasky Auditorium, Montefiore Medical Center

Accreditation: Albert Einstein College of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 credit towards the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity.

Host: Division of Infectious Diseases (Department of Medicine)

Contact Us

Department of Medicine
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus
Belfer Building - Room 1008
1300 Morris Park Avenue
Bronx, NY 10461 (directions)

718.430.2591
Fax: 718.430.8563

 
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