Institute for Aging Research

Overview

Aging is a complex, universal condition leading to the functional decline of all cells and organisms, and to major national and global public health problems.

Although aging is the major risk factor for developing most adult-onset diseases, systematic investigations into the fundamental physiology, biology and genetics of aging are only just beginning.

 
 

IN THE MEDIA

Wall Street Journal features new research by Nir Barzilai, M.D. that found lower levels of growth hormone are associated with extended lifespan in centenarians. Concerns about the dangers of using human growth hormone (HGH) as an anti-aging agent—a growing $4 billion industry—are increasing. Dr. Barzilai notes hormones that might have some beneficial effect for children with stunted growth may have a negative effect on aging adults. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research.

(Tuesday, March 25, 2014)

NPR interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about a new study that showed men who adopted healthier lifestyles had longer telomeres. Telomeres protect the tips of chromosomes and are associated with lower risk for many chronic diseases and longer lifespan. Dr. Barzilai notes that the study doesn't answer the fundamental question of causation — whether someone is healthy because they have longer telomeres or someone's telomeres become longer because they are healthy. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein's Institute for Aging Research.

(Tuesday, September 17, 2013)

Geoffrey Kabat, Ph.D., interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., in a Forbes article about his aging research and the genetic determinants of healthy longevity. Dr. Kabat reports that Dr. Barzilai’s lab has discovered several genetic variants that appear to extend human health-span, one of which is the basis of a drug currently in phase III clinical trials. Dr. Kabat is a senior epidemiologist at Einstein. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of Einstein’s Institute for Aging Research.

(Thursday, May 30, 2013)

Several Einstein faculty members and their research are featured in a National Geographic cover story on the potential genetic roots of longevity.  Harry Ostrer, M.D., Roee Holtzer, Ph.D., and Nir Barzilai, M.D., are quoted, providing insight into the some likely genetic factors of healthy aging and the varied physiological and behavioral outcomes of these factors. Ongoing epigenetic investigations by Francine Einstein, M.D. and John Greally, M.B.B.Ch, Ph.D., are also highlighted, as is Dr. Holtzer’s collaborator Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S.

(Thursday, April 18, 2013)

Richard Dawkins interviews Nir Bazilai, M.D., on U.K. TV about the trade-off between living longer and having fewer children. (Segment begins at 28:15) Mr. Dawkins, an English evolutionary biologist and author, also interviews Irving Kahn, a participant in Dr. Barzilai's The Longevity Genes Project, in his new series titled "Sex, Death and the Meaning of Life." Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research.

(Wednesday, October 31, 2012)

The Longevity Genes Project

Nir Barzilai, M.D.

In the Longevity Genes Project at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Dr. Nir Barzilai and his team conducted genetic research on more than 500 healthy elderly people between the ages of 95 and 112—and on their children.

The identification of longevity genes by Einstein researchers could lead to new drug therapies that might help people live longer, healthier lives and avoid or significantly delay age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

watch entire video series > 

 

Contact Us

Director 

Nir Barzilai, MD
Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research
Professor of Medicine and Genetics
Director, Institute for Aging Research
(718) 430-3144
Fax: (718) 430-8557
nir.barzilai@einstein.yu.edu 

See full Contact Info 

 
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