Media More Coverage

Einstein in the Media

NPR.com interviews Michal Melamed, M.D., about new research that finds it’s healthy for adults to take 600 I.U. of Vitamin D, which supports the current IOM recommendations. Because very low levels of vitamin D can lead to kidney and skeletal problems but taking supplements has been linked to higher risk for kidney stones and certain cancers, Dr. Melamed likens maintaining the right levels to Goldilocks: not too high or too low, but just right. Dr. Melamed is associate professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. 

(Thursday, November 01, 2012)

 

WebMD features new research by Michal Melamed, M.D., that found low levels of vitamin D is linked to allergies in children and adolescents. Although no such link was found in adults, children and adolescents who had vitamin D deficiencies exhibited an increased risk of sensitivity to food and environmental allergens like peanuts and ragweed. The study did not demonstrate that vitamin D deficiencies actually cause allergies. Dr. Melamed notes that the latest dietary recommendations for children (600 IU a day) should keep them from becoming deficient. Dr. Melamed is assistant professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. (Friday, February 25, 2011)

More coverage on this story

UPI
The Independent (UK)
About.com's "Katherine's Child Parenting Blog"

 

WebMD interviews Michal Melamed, M.D., regarding new guidelines by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that call for increasing the recommended dietary allowances of vitamin D and calcium. The IOM recommends that most Americans should consume 600-800 international units of vitamin D a day to optimize bone health. Dr. Melamed states that the new guidelines recommend a level of vitamin D that will keep people out of the deficiency range. The IOM discourages the use of high dose vitamin D supplements, however. Dr. Melamed is assistant professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. (Tuesday, November 30, 2010)

More coverage on this story

PBS Newshour
JAMA

 

The New York Times interviews Michal Melamed, M.D., on a new five-year clinical trial that will study the impact vitamin D and fish oil supplements have on lowering the risk for cancer and heart disease. Dr. Melamed points out that while estimates show that many Americans are vitamin D deficient, studies have not yet determined the risks of having too much vitamin D in the system. Dr. Melamed is assistant professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. (Tuesday, February 02, 2010)

 

The New York Times, USA Today and Scientific American interview Michal Melamed, M.D., on her study indicating millions of U.S. children are low in vitamin D. The study, published in the August 3rd online edition of Pediatrics, concludes that seven out of ten U.S. children are low in vitamin D, raising their risk of bone and heart disease. Dr. Melamed is assistant professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, August 03, 2009) read more...

More coverage on this story

USA Today
CNN
Scientific American “60-Second Science”
WNYC “The Takeaway”
U.S. News & World Report (Healthday)
UPI
WebMD.com
Parade.com
The Wall Street Journal “Health Blog”
Boston Globe
Baltimore Sun
About.com “Pediatrics Blog”
Fox News
CBS Early Show
NPR “All Things Considered”
US News and World Report (“On Parenting” Blog)
NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams
CNN “American Morning”
PBS “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer”
CBS News
Health.com
MedPage Today
Reuters
Pravda (Russia)
Fox5 (DC affiliate)
NBC4 (DC affiliate)
Huffington Post
Star-Ledger
KPCC (NPR, LA) "Air Talk"
AAFP.com (American Academy of Family Physicians)
The Washington Post
Financial Times

 

Health.com features an interview with Michal Melamed, M.D., about new research showing vitamin D can protect against the common cold. Dr. Melamed notes that diet is not the only source of vitamin D — sun exposure is another — and that many people are at risk for deficient levels of the vitamin when they rely solely on their diet for getting vitamin D. Dr. Melamed is assistant professor of medicine and of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, February 23, 2009) read more...

 

Reader's Digest quotes Dr. Michal Melamed, assistant professor of medicine, concerning her findings, which demonstrated that individuals who have low levels of Vitamin D are more likely to die early. (Thursday, January 01, 2009) read more...

More coverage on other stories