Einstein in the Media | U.S./Global

The New Yorker reports on the growing concern about concussions in soccer. Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., discusses his research on head injury in amateur players from heading. Dr. Lipton’s studies have found that repeated, deliberate sub-concussive hits from heading damages the brains of players and leads to cognitive and memory problems. Dr. Lipton is associate professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, October 02, 2014)

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Time features research led by Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., suggesting that brain scans measuring how quickly children process sensory information could be used to diagnose autism. The study found the degree to which a child abnormally processed sights and sounds was directly correlated to the severity of autism symptoms. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics and the Muriel and Harold Block Faculty Scholar in Mental Illness. (Monday, September 22, 2014)

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Wall Street Journal interviews Judy Wylie-Rosett, Ph.D., about research that suggests artificial sweeteners may raise blood sugar levels by altering the body’s gut bacteria. Dr. Wylie-Rosett notes that the study is important since it is the first to examine how gut microbes contribute to processing real and fake sugars. Dr. Wylie-Rosett is head of the division of health promotion and nutrition research, and professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine at Einstein. (Thursday, September 18, 2014)

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Nature interviews Dean Hosgood, Ph.D., M.P.H, about his research on the environmental and genetic factors that lead to high rates of lung cancer in non-smoking Asian women. Dr. Hosgood notes that as smoking decreases, other factors will become a larger proportion of lung cancer cases, so investigating this phenomenon can help the wider population. Dr. Hosgood is assistant professor of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, September 15, 2014)

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CBSNews.com interviews Lisa Shulman, M.D., about a promising autism intervention program that helped resolve autism behaviors in the majority of 7-to-15-month-olds studied. Dr. Shulman calls the study “groundbreaking” and also outlines a few key behaviors parents should look out for, such as fixating for long periods on objects rather than faces. Dr. Shulman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics and director of infant and toddler services at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and an attending physician at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, September 09, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about why more women than men develop Alzheimer’s disease. Research from Dr. Lipton’s Einstein Aging Study found that women, ages 70 to 79, were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia as men of the same age, but that after the age of 80 the risk is similar for both genders. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center. (Thursday, September 04, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about new research that found the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp was successful in treating monkeys infected with the virus. The drug was used to treat two American aid workers infected during the current West African outbreak. Dr. Chandran notes the preliminary results were astounding as following treatment all the monkeys were healthy. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology (Tuesday, September 02, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Kami Kim, M.D., about research that finds the parasite Toxoplasma gondii can manipulate the behavior of its host by switching on genes in brain cells. Research by Dr. Kim has found that a number of pathogens, including leprosy, appear to use DNA methylation to turn genes on and off in the animal it infects. Dr. Kim is professor medicine, of microbiology & immunology and of pathology. (Friday, August 29, 2014)

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NY1 interviews Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., about his research on Ebola that focuses on developing antibodies to use as a possible treatment for all five strains of the virus. Dr. Lai notes that so far his lab has discovered antibodies that have proven protective in mice against the Sudan strain of the Ebola virus, but more research is required. Dr. Lai is associate professor of biochemistry. (Tuesday, August 19, 2014)

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USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program. (Friday, August 15, 2014)

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NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on the controversy surrounding research on dangerous lab-made pathogens. Following the mishandling of smallpox by the CDC, the potential exposure of CDC scientists to live anthrax and even the recent the spread of Ebola, biologists and others are calling on the National Academy of Sciences to provide guidance on when and under what conditions research using lab-manipulated pathogens should be allowed to move forward. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Dr. Casadevall’s interview begins at 4:38 in the audio version) (Wednesday, August 13, 2014)

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BBC’s Newshour interviews Tia Powell, M.D., on the ethics of using experimental drug treatments in light of the current Ebola outbreak. Dr. Powell notes that weighing the risks versus benefits of unproven drugs is a complex and time intensive process. She maintains that in order to contain the current crisis, the focus should be on proven public health safety measures, including quarantine and supportive care. Dr. Powell is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and the Einstein-Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics program. (Audio begins at 38:45) (Monday, August 11, 2014)

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The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

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ABC-TV’s Good Morning America interviews Keith Ayoob, Ed.D., about a new CDC report that found nearly 25 percent of parents underestimate their children’s weight. The study also found that 27 percent of children and teens underestimate their own weight. Dr. Ayoob notes parents often believe that their children will outgrow being overweight, which is unlikely, and cautions against waiting to make dietary and lifestyle changes. Dr. Ayoob is associate clinical professor of pediatrics and director of the nutrition clinic at the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein. (Friday, August 01, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Solomon Moshé, M.D., about the case of a girl with a rare form of epilepsy that causes uncontrolled bouts of laughter. Dr. Moshe notes that these gelastic seizures aren’t sparked by happiness and can actually be quite scary for the patient. Dr. Moshé is director of the division of pediatric neurology and professor in The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and The Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience at Einstein as well as chief of pediatric neurology at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, June 24, 2014)

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