Einstein in the Media | U.S./Global

Science News interviews Betsy Herold, M.D., about her new research with William Jacobs, Jr., Ph.D., on an experimental herpes vaccine. Dr. Herold explains that their novel approach was to silence the loud, or dominant, surface protein on the virus in order to use the other proteins to trigger an effective immune response. Dr. Herold holds the Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Pediatrics at Einstein and is the chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Einstein. Dr. Jacobs is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Tuesday, March 10, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Jacobs, Jr. | Dr. Herold's Profile | Dr. Jacobs' Profile

 
 

The New York Times references Einstein’s centenarian studies and Nir Barzilai, M.D., in an obituary on 109-year old Irving Kahn. Kahn, considered the oldest active Wall Street investor before his death, was a participant in Dr. Barzilai’s studies at Einstein’s Institute of Aging Research. He was also profiled as part of Einstein’s Longevity Genes Project video series. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. (Friday, February 27, 2015)

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The Washington Post interviews Geoffrey Kabat, Ph.D. about the benefits and limitations of lifestyle and nutrition in preventing cancer. The article cites a recent study by Dr. Kabat in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that found following the American Cancer Society’s guidelines could reduce the risk for certain cancers and overall mortality. Dr. Kabat is a senior epidemiologist at Einstein. (Tuesday, February 17, 2015)

 
 

USA Today interviews Dr. David Rosenstreich about research that finds poverty and poor living conditions are the causes of high rates of asthma – whether in cities or suburbs. As the concentration of poverty has increased in suburbs and rural areas, so have the rates of asthma in those areas. Dr. Rosenstreich points out that the asthma rates are vastly different in Harlem compared to the Upper West Side of Manhattan, although the two neighborhoods are next to each other. This reinforces that it is low socioeconomic status and associated poor living conditions that leads to asthma. Dr. Rosenstreich is professor and director of the division of allergy and immunology in the department of medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center and the Joseph and Sadie Danciger Distinguished Scholar in Microbiology/Immunology at Einstein. (Tuesday, January 20, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Rosenstreich | Dr. Rosenstreich's Profile

 
 

Al Jazeera America interviews bioethicist Lauren Flicker, J.D., M.B.E., about the ethical implications of forced chemotherapy on a 17-year-old Connecticut teen. Flicker notes the myriad legal and ethical implications of the case, and how even adults may not make informed decisions about refusing medical care. She is assistant professor of epidemiology & population health at Einstein, assistant director of graduate studies, Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics and assistant director of Einstein-Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics. (Thursday, January 15, 2015)

Dr. Flicker's Profile

 
 

The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a promising multi-drug approach to treating Alzheimer’s diseases. Dr. Lipton notes that combining therapies, rather than relying on a single drug, tends to be more effective, but cautions that this new treatment has yet to be tested in humans. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, January 12, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Lipton | Dr. Lipton's Profile

 
 

The Scientist interviews Vladislav Verkhusha, Ph.D., about in vivo imaging techniques researchers can use to monitor and track infection in small mammals. Dr. Verkhusha has developed a variety of fluorescent proteins for imaging use. Dr. Verkhusha is professor of anatomy and structural biology. (Wednesday, January 07, 2015)

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What’s a question your doctor should be asking you according to a Time interview with Peter Selwyn, M.D., M.P.H., and Einstein medical student Ross Kristal? Their study, which found a correlation between soda consumption and health problems, suggests that asking how much soda a patient drinks should be included when taking a patient’s history. Kristal, a fourth year medical student, notes that information about overall diet and physical activity are vital in preventing and managing certain diseases but is rarely captured, which is why the question is standard at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein. Dr. Selwyn is chair of family and social medicine at Einstein and Montefiore. (Tuesday, December 30, 2014)

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Scientific American interviews Dr. Peter Satir about the connection between cilia, hairlike structures on cells, and genetic disorders, such as blindness or kidney disease. Dr. Satir notes that primary cilia serve as a signaling system during embryonic development, but when that pathway is disrupted due to deformed cilia, genetic disorders, can occur. Dr. Satir is distinguished university professor of anatomy and structural biology. (Tuesday, December 23, 2014)

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The New York Times published an op-ed co-written by Sean Lucan, M.D., M.P.H., that argues for the consumption of natural foods, rather than packaged foods full of added sugars. The piece notes that about 75 percent of packaged foods purchased in the U.S. contain added sugar. Dr. Lucan and his co-author compare refined sugars to drugs, citing research that shows sugar can be addictive as well as cause cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Dr. Lucan is assistant professor of family and social medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, December 23, 2014)

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NPR’s Shots blog interviews Karen Bonuck, Ph.D., about her study that found lack of sleep and sleep-disordered breathing doubled kids’ risk for obesity. Dr. Bonuck emphasizes the need to promote healthy sleep in children, noting, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure… Pun intended.” Dr. Bonuck is professor of family and social medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein. (Thursday, December 11, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Einstein medical student, Joseph Gotesman, and Michael Reichgott, M.D., Ph.D., about VetConnect, an organization to help homeless veterans. Since founding VetConnect to connect local, Bronx veterans to needed services, Mr. Gotesman’s grassroots initiative has helped several veterans get permanent housing and find employment. Mr. Gotesman, who is in his second-year at Einstein, is trying to expand the initiative to other states with high rates of homelessness among veterans. Dr. Reichgott is professor of medicine at Einstein. (Friday, November 14, 2014)

Dr. Reichgott's profile

 
 

Capital New York features research by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., that examines the impact of repeated blast exposures on the brains of veterans. Dr. Lipton notes that more exposures result in increased abnormalities and worse symptoms. Dr. Lipton is professor of radiology and associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Einstein and medical director of MRI services at Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, November 11, 2014)

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The Christian Science Monitor interviews Tia Powell, M.D., about the ethics and policies around the dying with dignity movement in light of Brittany Maynard’s decision to end her life due to terminal brain cancer. Dr. Powell notes that better and more universal access to palliative care is necessary before any new policies are made so as to ensure more vulnerable populations, such as minorities and lower-income families, do not choose assisted death due to financial concerns. Dr. Powell is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and the Einstein-Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics program. (Wednesday, November 05, 2014)

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Wall Street Journal interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Steven Walkley, D.V.M., Ph.D., about the connection between the rare genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Ebola. Dr. Chandran’s research suggests that the gene mutation responsible for NPC may offer protection against Ebola. Dr. Walkley notes that it is well-known that carriers of certain genetic diseases might have protection against other diseases, citing that carriers for sickle-cell disease might be protected against malaria. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology. Dr. Walkley is director of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center and professor of pathology, of neurology and of neuroscience at Einstein. (subscription only) (Monday, November 03, 2014)

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